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visits member for 1 year, 5 months
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Financial mathematician-beginner (~2 years since I pretty much just discovered what mathematics is)

Studied: Real analysis, linear algebra, a little of probability, numerical methods, some discrete mathematics / graph theory.

Currently studying: Complex analysis, probability, basics of statistics, optimalisation, euclidean geometry.

Interests (and future goals): Stochastic processes, financial derivatives, measure theory and somewhat unrelated interests for topology (not that I understand anyting, I merely find it interesting) and history of mathematics.


Mar
27
asked Characteristic polynomial of an involution
Mar
27
comment Involution $\Rightarrow$ Hermitian & Unitary
Thanks @WesonJiang, that's actually a very insightful way to think intuitively about these things.
Mar
27
comment Involution $\Rightarrow$ Hermitian & Unitary
Thanks a lot, an amazing answer!
Mar
27
accepted Involution $\Rightarrow$ Hermitian & Unitary
Mar
27
comment Involution $\Rightarrow$ Hermitian & Unitary
Thanks, the sudden introduction of all the new names for matrices still confuses me a little.
Mar
27
revised Involution $\Rightarrow$ Hermitian & Unitary
added 3 characters in body
Mar
27
comment Involution $\Rightarrow$ Hermitian & Unitary
Oh, yes, sorry, I added that to the question. Thanks for clearing that up, still, why would that be true?
Mar
27
asked Involution $\Rightarrow$ Hermitian & Unitary
Feb
4
accepted Limit of a Composite Function
Feb
4
accepted Heine-Borel for reals
Jan
22
comment Why is $y = \sqrt{x-4}$ a function? and $y = \sqrt{4 - x^2}$ should be a circle
Further reading on wikipedia
Jan
19
comment Limit of a Composite Function
Sorry for taking so long, I needed to review the topics before limits, as I felt my knowledge is not deep enough to understand this properly. Is the following then correct? (1) If $f$ is continuous, then we do not need to worry about $g(x)=A$ as $f(A)$ exists and is equal to the limits. (2) In this case, $g(x)$ can never equal to A $\forall x$. (3) If $g$ is strictly monotonous, then $g(x)=A$ only for one point and that point could only be $a$, which we are not considering, therefore $g(x)\neq A$ $\forall x\in D(f)\setminus\{a\}$
Jan
19
accepted Intuition behind convex functions
Jan
17
answered Intuition behind convex functions
Jan
17
comment Intuition behind convex functions
You are right, @HaraldHanche-Olsen.
Jan
17
revised Intuition behind convex functions
added 278 characters in body
Jan
17
comment Intuition behind convex functions
Thanks all. I should've perhaps mentioned that I did indeed observe the wikipedia picture before, but as it often happens, I wasn't able to make sense of it until somebody wiser points me towards it, saying "look at it, it's simple". @JavaMan I'll try to do that now.
Jan
17
revised Intuition behind convex functions
added 98 characters in body
Jan
17
revised Intuition behind convex functions
added 80 characters in body; deleted 8 characters in body
Jan
17
asked Intuition behind convex functions