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visits member for 1 years, 5 months
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Financial mathematician-beginner (~2 years since I pretty much just discovered what mathematics is)

Studied: Real analysis, linear algebra, a little of probability, numerical methods, some discrete mathematics / graph theory.

Currently studying: Complex analysis, probability, basics of statistics, optimalisation, euclidean geometry.

Interests (and future goals): Stochastic processes, financial derivatives, measure theory and somewhat unrelated interests for topology (not that I understand anyting, I merely find it interesting) and history of mathematics.


Jan
31
answered Odds of picking the same number
Jan
27
answered I'm trying to understand an equality
Jan
27
comment Solving a limit with logarithm and GIF
About using other methods - how about using the equivalence of Heine-Cauchy definition of a limit of a function/sequence and seeing this as a limit of a sequence?
Jan
27
comment Solving a limit with logarithm and GIF
Please correct the notation, this way it is unclear what the actual limit is.
Jan
26
comment Limits at infinity
By the way, what you did isn't "wrong", it just doesn't help you anyhow in this case.
Jan
23
accepted How do I see that $x^5+x-1=(x^2-x+1)(x^3+x^2-1)$
Jan
23
comment How do I see that $x^5+x-1=(x^2-x+1)(x^3+x^2-1)$
Thanks for an alternative route, I was thinking something similar, will try.
Jan
23
comment How do I see that $x^5+x-1=(x^2-x+1)(x^3+x^2-1)$
@GrigoryM, of course, you are right, I am only being blind, having not noticed that the two polynomials are identical.
Jan
23
comment How do I see that $x^5+x-1=(x^2-x+1)(x^3+x^2-1)$
Ahh the mistakes one does when dealing with things out of one's comfort zone! Of course, now I feel stupid, thanks.
Jan
23
asked How do I see that $x^5+x-1=(x^2-x+1)(x^3+x^2-1)$
Jan
22
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
21
accepted Standard deviation - a general confusion.
Jan
18
comment Expressing $x^5-2x^3+6x^2+1$ as a sum of powers of $x+2$
Thanks. Horner Scheme often shows up, solving problems that I wouldn't think would be related, seems like one of the tricks I really should have a closer look at.
Jan
18
comment Expressing $x^5-2x^3+6x^2+1$ as a sum of powers of $x+2$
Thanks, that's the trick of course, I guess I really need to work on my Taylor expansion to spot these!
Jan
18
accepted Expressing $x^5-2x^3+6x^2+1$ as a sum of powers of $x+2$
Jan
18
comment Expressing $x^5-2x^3+6x^2+1$ as a sum of powers of $x+2$
Thanks, although that is pretty much the same as using a matrix for that, only imo harder to compute.
Jan
18
asked Expressing $x^5-2x^3+6x^2+1$ as a sum of powers of $x+2$
Jan
18
comment Investigating $\sum_{n=1}^\infty \frac{\log{n}}{n^c}$
Okay, too hasty. Looking at the last series, I need $\epsilon-c<-1$, so $\epsilon<c-1$ should hopefully do the trick.. right?
Jan
18
comment Investigating $\sum_{n=1}^\infty \frac{\log{n}}{n^c}$
How about $\epsilon=1-c$ then?
Jan
18
comment Investigating $\sum_{n=1}^\infty \frac{\log{n}}{n^c}$
I knew there's a catch somewhere, thanks :) The sign was a typo, corrected.