15,857 reputation
13585
bio website linkedin.com/in/crntaylor
location London, United Kingdom
age 31
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 18 hours ago

I'm broadly interested in very applied math. I try to apply ideas from mathematics, statistics, machine learning, formal systems and computer science to solve real-world problems. Mostly in applied finance/quantitative trading, but in other areas if the mood takes me.


The following is for my own use, but feel free to borrow it -

Hi. It looks like you are new here. We are generally very willing to help, but we like users to show the work that they've done towards solving the problem on their own first. If you can edit your question to show the code you've written so far, and where you are stuck, then you will get a much better response.


Jan
10
comment How to compute the output of floating numbers?
No problem - it's good to have you here at Math Stack Exchange!
Jan
10
revised How to compute the output of floating numbers?
added 16 characters in body
Jan
10
revised Explain cosmic distances to a child
added 218 characters in body
Jan
10
revised Explain cosmic distances to a child
added 218 characters in body
Jan
10
comment Explain cosmic distances to a child
@Ethan Indeed. Or about 350 blocks in New York City.
Jan
10
answered Explain cosmic distances to a child
Jan
9
comment Are there more even numbers than odd numbers?
@Jordy This next bit, you'll have to imagine me saying in a stage whisper. Here it is: mathematicians have come up with a way of treating $\infty$ as a number! Shh, don't tell anyone. If you want the secrets, you'll have to learn a bit more math, and then go and read about transfinite ordinals. The smallest infinite ordinal is normally written $\omega$. Confusingly, $1+\omega=\omega$, but $\omega+1>\omega$.
Jan
9
comment Are there more even numbers than odd numbers?
@Jordy The mistake was in thinking that $\infty$ is a number, and that $\infty+1$ is an expression that makes sense. It's easy to see that $\infty$ isn't a number, for here is a list of all the numbers: $\{0,1,2,3,4,\dots\}$. Where is $\infty$ in that list? You can't say "at the end", because the list doesn't have an end! (You also can't say "it's the ninth element in the list, but it's fallen over.")
Jan
9
answered Are there more even numbers than odd numbers?
Jan
9
comment There exists a power of 2 such that the last five digits are all 3's or 6's. Find the last 5 digits of this number
Thanks, this was very interesting.
Jan
8
comment There exists a power of 2 such that the last five digits are all 3's or 6's. Find the last 5 digits of this number
In case anyone is interested, the first such powers of 2 are $2^{1196}$, $2^{3696}$, $2^{6196}$ ... and all solutions are of the form $2^{1196 + 2500k}$ for $k=0,1,2,\dots$.
Jan
8
comment Confusion with the definition of mean value
@jjepsuomi Sure, it isn't a sum of function values. As I said, it is a generalization or a limit of a sum of function values, and the $\mu$ that you define in your question is a generalization or a limit of a mean. But we just call it a mean, because in most cases it behaves just like a mean.
Jan
8
answered Confusion with the definition of mean value
Jan
6
revised Let $L : K$ be a field extension such that $[L:K]=2$. Show that $L:K$ is a normal extension.
rolled back to a previous revision
Dec
31
answered negative number divided by positive number, what would be remainder?
Dec
30
comment Mathematicians don't quit, they fade away
No one has mentioned finance, which has a hunger for mathematicians educated up to grad school level, to work as traders, structurers, model validators, derivative pricing quants, risk quants, developers/researchers for trading algorithms etc etc.
Dec
26
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
19
answered All solutions of $a+b+c=abc$ in natural numbers
Dec
17
awarded  Yearling