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May
21
comment A fair coin is flipped 2k times. What is the probability that it comes up tails more often than it comes up heads?
It seems likely that the "2k" in the question refers to a general even number $2k$ rather than "2000".
May
7
comment Help with 2 questions my professor gave us
For (i) assume there are two solutions $a,b$ s.t. $a^2=r$ and $b^2=r$ with $a\neq b$. Then either $a>b$ or $a<b$. Can you derive a contradiction?
May
7
reviewed Approve Help with 2 questions my professor gave us
May
6
comment How to draw contour lines for a bivariate Gaussian distribution by hand!
Are you talking about a 2d gaussian distribution?
May
6
revised A quick way to determine whether a number is prime by hand
added 355 characters in body
May
6
revised A quick way to determine whether a number is prime by hand
added 513 characters in body
May
6
revised A quick way to determine whether a number is prime by hand
added 513 characters in body
May
6
answered A quick way to determine whether a number is prime by hand
May
2
awarded  Announcer
Apr
29
answered Bifurcation values for logistic map
Apr
14
awarded  Enlightened
Apr
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
4
answered Is it possible to fit any regression line to a set of data points?
Apr
3
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
23
awarded  Enlightened
Mar
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
5
comment Game Theory/Bayesian approach to a bluffing game
@DanielR Pretty sure (although open to being proved wrong). Player 1's expectation, if he bluffs with probability $q$, is $E = 0.2(2p + (1-p)) + 0.8(q(-p + (1-p)))$ which simplified to $E=0.2(1+p) + 0.8q(1-2p)$. Therefore if $p>0.5$ the second term is negative, so $q=0$ maximizes the expectation. If $p<0.5$ the second term is positive, so $q=1$ maximizes the expectation. This assumes that player 2 never changes their strategy, of course.
Mar
5
asked Game Theory/Bayesian approach to a bluffing game
Mar
5
answered Probability Discrepancy in drawing 2 cards from a Deck of 52
Mar
4
comment What is equivalence of $(p \vee q) \wedge \neg (p \vee q)$?
Let $a = p \vee q$. Then you have $a \wedge ¬ a$.