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  • 10 votes cast
Feb
7
comment Is there a syntax to refer to the domain of a partial function?
Thanks. Is $Dom(R)$ standard or do I have to define it as you did before I use it?
Feb
7
comment Is there a syntax to refer to the domain of a partial function?
Thanks for clarifying that. What guarantees the uniqueness of the first element of the pair though with respect to the other pairs? And what is the way of referring to the set of first elements of each pair?
Feb
7
asked Is there a syntax to refer to the domain of a partial function?
Feb
7
accepted Can I use set operators on sequences?
Feb
7
comment Can I use set operators on sequences?
Yes. I don't have the issue though in my case, I just want to state whether an element is in a sequence or not. I am not comparing sequences.
Feb
7
comment Can I use set operators on sequences?
Thanks, yes I agree its clearer. Is there a way to say that an element is in a sequence though?
Feb
7
asked Can I use set operators on sequences?
Jan
19
comment Is there a standard way to obtain an approximation piecewise-linear function for a function
Yes but its not what I want. I want a piecewise linear function, represented by a set of points.
Jan
19
comment Is there a standard way to obtain an approximation piecewise-linear function for a function
@njuffa Not sure what's unclear. If I have a function $f(x)$ I want a vector of pairs $(<x_0, f(x_0)>, <x_1, f(x_1)>, ... )$ that represent a piecewise-linear approximation of the curve of $f(x)$. I do not know $x_0, x_1 ... $ for each function, so discovering them is part of the algorithm I am looking for, and they will be specific for each specific function, and not at regular intervals. I do not want a polynomial approximation though, just a piecewise-linear one.
Jan
18
comment Is there a standard way to obtain an approximation piecewise-linear function for a function
Fair enough, changed to $g(x)$ :). Any idea how do I go about this, or from where do I start looking?
Jan
18
revised Is there a standard way to obtain an approximation piecewise-linear function for a function
deleted 1 character in body
Jan
18
asked Is there a standard way to obtain an approximation piecewise-linear function for a function
Dec
20
awarded  Caucus
Dec
20
accepted Computing the value of a function whose derivative is another function
Dec
19
comment Computing the value of a function whose derivative is another function
Cheers. So if $g(t)$ itself is also a function dependent on $h(t)$, I should start at the bottom, integrate each, until I arrive to the integral of $g(t)$. Am I on the right track?
Dec
19
comment Computing the value of a function whose derivative is another function
@KSmarts Well I might need to compute $g(t)$ depending on some other function, but in the simplest case they will all boil down to a constant rate linear function.
Dec
19
comment Computing the value of a function whose derivative is another function
@AndrewSalmon By dependent variables I meant the functions on which $f(t)$ depends on. For example the state of charge of a battery depends on time spent charging and the temperature, but temperature also changes according to time.
Dec
19
asked Computing the value of a function whose derivative is another function
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
10
accepted Biasing sigmoid curve