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Jul
13
comment Mathematics Article Collection Books for Talented High School Students
@MariusKempe Are these recommended by V. I. Arnold?
Jun
8
comment Dirac delta function with a sum as the argument
This answer is "2-good". BTW do you know any book containing all the tricks involving the Dirac delta function? @anon
Jun
8
accepted Dirac delta function with a sum as the argument
Jun
5
comment Dirac delta function with a sum as the argument
@anon You say that because it will solve the transition between 2 and 3 or because you made the change of variables to obtain 2 from 1?
Jun
5
revised Dirac delta function with a sum as the argument
Adding an important thing to notice.
Jun
5
asked Dirac delta function with a sum as the argument
Apr
14
revised Method of solving no-homogeneous recurrence equation
Adding details
Apr
14
revised Method of solving no-homogeneous recurrence equation
editing the title
Apr
14
asked How fast was the Turing's machine for breaking the enigma code?
Apr
11
awarded  Yearling
Apr
11
awarded  Self-Learner
Mar
18
revised Method of solving no-homogeneous recurrence equation
adding details
Mar
18
comment Method of solving no-homogeneous recurrence equation
@AlexR. I just have an initial condition: $M(t=0)=0$.
Mar
18
revised Method of solving no-homogeneous recurrence equation
correcting some expressions
Mar
18
comment Method of solving no-homogeneous recurrence equation
@Qmechanic You're right. I made a mistake trying to write the general form of the equation. The correct expression of the coefficient of the sum is $c/(t+1)$.
Mar
11
revised Method of solving no-homogeneous recurrence equation
adding labels
Mar
11
revised Method of solving no-homogeneous recurrence equation
adding more details and changing the title
Mar
11
comment Method of solving no-homogeneous recurrence equation
@Qmechanic Maybe, I posted the question here because we, physicist, can solve equations heuristically or exactly. But answering your question: yes, it would be better.
Mar
11
asked Method of solving no-homogeneous recurrence equation
Dec
28
comment Why is $\lim_{x \to \infty}(\int_0^n k^{1-x}\,\,di)^{1/(1-x)} = k$ when $k,n>0$ is constant real?
In that case the limit is equal to 1.