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1d
comment Application Stokes's Theorem
@Paul, Again, thanks a lot for your help! I've figured it out!
1d
answered Application Stokes's Theorem
1d
comment Application Stokes's Theorem
@Paul, You read it the right way. It's just that I was a bit unsure whether it would be (1,0,1) or (1,1,1). Thank you for describing the parameterization!
1d
comment Application Stokes's Theorem
@Paul, is the normal vector supposed to be $(1,1,1)$? Feels to be the case.
1d
asked Application Stokes's Theorem
1d
accepted Evaluating a triple integral by inspection
1d
comment Evaluating a triple integral by inspection
Thank you! +1 :)
1d
comment Evaluating a triple integral by inspection
Thank you for your suggestion! I attempted to use cylindrical coordinates (as can be seen in my answer), but it does not seem to give me the right answer :(. Do you see what I am doing wrong?
1d
revised Evaluating a triple integral by inspection
added 299 characters in body
May
25
asked Evaluating a triple integral by inspection
May
24
asked Proving that average value of $u$ around a circle is the value of $u$ at the centre.
May
12
accepted Evaluating double integrals by inspection
May
12
comment Evaluating double integrals by inspection
Thank you! I think I get it. Since the domain is symmetric, the positive and negative sides cancel out, which leads to zero (for $2y$ term). Thus, the area is $9$. +1
May
12
comment Evaluating double integrals by inspection
@KittyL, I found a type in the question. I forgot the $3x$. Based on this correction, does my conclusion (i.e. application of Green's theorem) make sense?
May
12
revised Evaluating double integrals by inspection
typo fix
May
12
asked Evaluating double integrals by inspection
May
10
asked Find the flux of $F=m\vec r/|\vec r|^3$ out of the surface of the cube
May
4
comment Finding the flux of the surface $z=a-x^2-y^2$ lying above $z=b<a$
I think I get it! Thank you! :)
May
4
comment Finding the flux of the surface $z=a-x^2-y^2$ lying above $z=b<a$
@user197427, thank you for noticing this error!