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Dec
23
asked Why does the definition of limits of a function have strict inequality?
Dec
23
accepted finding a limit of a function by definition
Dec
23
comment finding a limit of a function by definition
Both solutions really helped me. From what you gave me I was able to realize what my delta needs to be, and the solution below allowed me to understand how I'm supposed to write a proof on these matter. Thank you both!
Dec
23
asked finding a limit of a function by definition
Dec
16
comment Proving that $m^p-m$ is divisible by $p$
A lot of concepts here I'm not familiar with...
Dec
16
accepted Proving that $m^p-m$ is divisible by $p$
Dec
16
asked Proving that $m^p-m$ is divisible by $p$
Dec
9
accepted Limit of $\left(\frac{n^{2}+8n-1}{n^{2}-4n-5}\right)^{n}$, is the following true?
Dec
9
comment Limit of $\left(\frac{n^{2}+8n-1}{n^{2}-4n-5}\right)^{n}$, is the following true?
lol yeah... that's right... So I guess it's wrong that $\lim \left(\frac{n^{2}+8n-1}{n^{2}-4n-5}\right)^{n} = (\lim \left(\frac{n^{2}+8n-1}{n^{2}-4n-5}\right))^n$ huh?... Oh after thinking about this for a while (using the answer given after I started typing as well) I think I see why it's wrong. Thanks!
Dec
9
asked Limit of $\left(\frac{n^{2}+8n-1}{n^{2}-4n-5}\right)^{n}$, is the following true?
Dec
8
accepted Proving that $(1+\frac{x}{n})^n\to e^x$?
Dec
8
comment Proving that $(1+\frac{x}{n})^n\to e^x$?
hmm that was simple enough. Thank you!
Dec
8
comment Proving that $(1+\frac{x}{n})^n\to e^x$?
Yeah I do. Though I mentioned it, my bad :p
Dec
8
asked Proving that $(1+\frac{x}{n})^n\to e^x$?
Dec
8
comment Partial limits of sequences
@yoyo for a private case or the general case, how would you prove this is indeed the number of partial limits? (sorry for coming back to such an old question, but I got it as related when about to ask a similar question)
Dec
5
comment $\mathbb{R}\subset\mathbb{F}\subset\mathbb{C}$ implies $\mathbb{F}=\mathbb{R}$ or $\mathbb{F}=\mathbb{C}$?
hmm.. Interesting. But I'm not sure how to conclude $i\in\mathbb{F}$ from that. mind clarifying?
Dec
5
accepted $\mathbb{R}\subset\mathbb{F}\subset\mathbb{C}$ implies $\mathbb{F}=\mathbb{R}$ or $\mathbb{F}=\mathbb{C}$?
Dec
5
comment $\mathbb{R}\subset\mathbb{F}\subset\mathbb{C}$ implies $\mathbb{F}=\mathbb{R}$ or $\mathbb{F}=\mathbb{C}$?
Oh yeah... You reminded me that we did prove that fields are vector spaces above subfields of themselves. This really does make it a lot simpler. Thank you!
Dec
5
asked $\mathbb{R}\subset\mathbb{F}\subset\mathbb{C}$ implies $\mathbb{F}=\mathbb{R}$ or $\mathbb{F}=\mathbb{C}$?
Dec
1
awarded  Enthusiast