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Apr
1
awarded  Necromancer
Nov
30
comment Is there a voting method with a sane strategy?
But if you imagine just a simple cycle (one person prefers $A>B>C$, another $B>C>A$ and the third $C>A>B$) such that the group prefers $A>B>C>A$, then the voting method (say a particular agenda) dictates the strategic voting (via backward induction) as well as the outcome. So (1) it's not that there aren't "sane" strategies for many popular voting methods, (2) for many people, telling the truth may be that "sane" strategy, and (3) the less information people have, the less strategic they can be, so the truth may be the best you can vote.
Nov
30
comment Is there a voting method with a sane strategy?
This is a great question! One of the assumptions in social choice theory is that interpersonal utilities can't be compared, so when we talk about solution concepts (say Pareto or Condorcet or core), we consider only ordinal preferences. If there is only one or a top cycle of these solution concepts, it's possible to denote voting methods and "sane" strategies given a structure on the preferences and common knowledge among participants. You should consider asking this on a Game Theory StackExchange
Nov
29
answered Game Theory - Unsure how to proceed with this question
Nov
29
answered Cooperative Game Theory specialized forum
Nov
29
answered Game with a coin in the hand
Nov
29
awarded  Editor
Nov
29
revised How is prisoner's dilemma different from chicken?
reversed matrix order to traditional order of (row player, column player)
Nov
29
comment Second Price Auction (Generalized Second Price)
Great answer! You should consider the Game Theory proposal
Nov
29
comment Sunk cost auction modeling.
If the number of participants is known beforehand (say $n$) as opposed to free entry, this could be the non-sealed-bid version of an all-pay auction (though it does have the flavor of a war-of-attrition); however in the equilibrium (via Revenue Equivalence Theorem), only those who believed they might win would bid and bid high to deter competition. Maybe someone on a Game Theory StackExchange could answer your question...
Nov
28
answered Is there experimental evidence that people ever play mixed Nash equilibrium in real games?
Nov
28
awarded  Supporter
Nov
28
answered How is prisoner's dilemma different from chicken?
Nov
27
comment Simple game with coins - strategy
There is almost certainly a dynamic programming solution; it's almost equivalent to another problem I've seen with the exception that you can take both stacks.
Nov
27
answered Game theory - self study
Oct
30
awarded  Teacher
Oct
21
answered Why is the event of both A and B occurring equal to the product of their probabilities?