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Apr
27
comment Moving Sphere, Line Intersection?
So in mathematical terms: s0 = 0, s = k * maxs, where k is the percent, and maxs = maximum allowed displacement. For the sphere intersection, do you want intersection for only the surface of the sphere, or do you want solid sphere intersection? Also, you may want to review parametric equations.
Apr
27
comment Moving Sphere, Line Intersection?
I'm now confused. Velocity is the change in displacement over change in time (dv/dt). Displacement is the change of position relative to an arbitrary origin point. When you say the initial position/displacement is at 0.0, do you mean the sphere starts centered at the origin (x = 0, y = 0, z = 0)? I don't understand the 1.0 figure (I assume this is a follow-up on how you defined velocity). The motion equation I gave you only works when the velocity stays constant.
Apr
27
comment Moving Sphere, Line Intersection?
What are you trying to solve for? Are you trying to solve exactly when the sphere finally intersects with the line segment after some amount of time?
Apr
27
awarded  Commentator
Apr
27
comment Moving Sphere, Line Intersection?
Sorry, t is not time, but is instead the change in time (delta time). If you know the time interval (that is, when it starts and stops), you can calculate the time difference and plug that into the motion equation to find where the sphere is.
Apr
27
comment Moving Sphere, Line Intersection?
Using a motion equation s = v*t + s0, where s0 = initial position, v = velocity, t = time, s = final position, you can evaluate the position of the sphere at any given amount of time. Along with the sphere equation (x - x0)^2 + (y-y0)^2 + (z-z0)^2 = r^2, you can use this to solve for sphere intersections with a line segment (assuming that a line segment is "a line that has a starting and end vertex").
Feb
14
comment Does $\log(x)$ stop at a finite value when x is infinite?
Sorry for commenting about this now, but I meant the domain of $f(x) = (0, \infty)$ when $k \ne 0$, or $[0, \infty)$ when $k = 0$, where $f(x) = log_a(a^k) = k$
Nov
14
comment Could $\frac x0 = \pm\infty$?
@TheChaz It's related, but I wouldn't call it duplicate because that question also talks about morality, which is off-topic on this website.
Nov
14
comment Could $\frac x0 = \pm\infty$?
Kinda ironic saying nothing can equal to infinity when сhееsеr1 said that we know that already. Nice answer though.
Nov
14
revised Could $\frac x0 = \pm\infty$?
added 10 characters in body
Nov
14
comment Could $\frac x0 = \pm\infty$?
The two solutions. One at negative infinity, the other at positive infinity. Although maybe this is a bad idea to use quadratics here.
Nov
14
asked Could $\frac x0 = \pm\infty$?
Oct
30
comment How to find 'b' in straight line equation?
How is that calculus?
Oct
30
awarded  Editor
Oct
30
revised Does $\log(x)$ stop at a finite value when x is infinite?
edited body; edited tags
Oct
30
awarded  Scholar
Oct
30
accepted Does $\log(x)$ stop at a finite value when x is infinite?
Oct
30
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Oct
30
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Oct
30
comment Does $\log(x)$ stop at a finite value when x is infinite?
And k is positive.