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seen Aug 25 at 21:44

Sep
28
revised Why are the centers of $R$ and $\text{End}_{\text{Ab}}(R)$ isomorphic?
added 157 characters in body
Sep
27
revised Why are the centers of $R$ and $\text{End}_{\text{Ab}}(R)$ isomorphic?
added 123 characters in body
Sep
27
comment Why are the centers of $R$ and $\text{End}_{\text{Ab}}(R)$ isomorphic?
@Pierre-Yves Gaillard: Thanks for the suggestion. I have added the author's name. The book is part of the Graduate Studies in Mathematics series.
Sep
27
revised Why are the centers of $R$ and $\text{End}_{\text{Ab}}(R)$ isomorphic?
added 16 characters in body
Sep
27
revised Why are the centers of $R$ and $\text{End}_{\text{Ab}}(R)$ isomorphic?
edited body
Sep
27
comment Why are the centers of $R$ and $\text{End}_{\text{Ab}}(R)$ isomorphic?
Well that's strange. I can't see any error in what you wrote; have I misunderstood the exercise? Here is the text exactly as it appears: "2.17. Let $R$ be a ring, and let $E = \text{End}_{\text{Ab}}(R)$ be the ring of endomorphisms of the underlying abelian group $(R, +)$. Prove that the center of $E$ is isomorphic to the center of $R$."
Sep
27
asked Why are the centers of $R$ and $\text{End}_{\text{Ab}}(R)$ isomorphic?
Sep
26
accepted Does this “extension property” for polynomial rings satisfy a universal property?
Sep
26
revised Does this “extension property” for polynomial rings satisfy a universal property?
edited title
Sep
26
revised Does this “extension property” for polynomial rings satisfy a universal property?
edited tags
Sep
26
asked Does this “extension property” for polynomial rings satisfy a universal property?
Aug
23
comment Prove that all even integers $n \neq 2^k$ are expressible as a sum of consecutive positive integers
$10 = 1 + 2 + 3 + 4$, $12 = 3 + 4 + 5$
Aug
16
comment Can a circle's circumference be divided into arbitrary number of equal parts using straight edge and compass only?
Very nice answer! +1
Aug
10
answered Is there a way to pick a $k$ such that $p_0p_1 + ik$ is always a product of two primes?
Aug
10
comment Is there a way to pick a $k$ such that $p_0p_1 + ik$ is always a product of two primes?
My point is that if $k \neq 0$, then $p_0p_1 + ik$ always has at least 3 prime factors for $i = p_0p_1$.
Aug
10
comment Is there a way to pick a $k$ such that $p_0p_1 + ik$ is always a product of two primes?
$p_0p_1+(p_0p_1)k = p_0p_1 (1 + k)$, no?
Jun
16
awarded  Enthusiast
Jun
11
accepted Combinatorial proof that binomial coefficients are given by alternating sums of squares?
Jun
11
comment Combinatorial proof that binomial coefficients are given by alternating sums of squares?
Very nice! (characters...)
Jun
11
asked Combinatorial proof that binomial coefficients are given by alternating sums of squares?