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Feb
15
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How to draw a hyperbola?
Feb
14
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Consider convergence of series
Feb
13
reviewed Looks OK Difference between closed, bounded and compact sets.
Feb
13
reviewed Edit Proving this inequality
Feb
13
revised Proving this inequality
clarified that the answer is a counter example.
Feb
13
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Dice problem with a stopping rule
Feb
13
reviewed Reviewed Unreachable rubik cube positions.
Feb
13
comment Unreachable rubik cube positions.
The OP explicitly stated "by applying standard moves", so moving stickers doesn't count. This answer does not address the intent of the OP.
Feb
13
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Finding Tangent Line and Slope of a curve
Feb
12
comment Linear Algebra - Show that $M$ is not a vector space
So $\begin{bmatrix}0&b\\c&d\end{bmatrix}$ and $\begin{bmatrix}a&b\\c&0\end{bmatrix}$ are in the set. Is their sum in the set?
Feb
12
comment Linear Algebra - Show that $M$ is not a vector space
Is the set closed under addition?
Feb
12
reviewed Close Biggest integer where the product of many consecutive is at large as it could be?
Feb
11
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How to show if a function is continuous
Feb
9
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Find subfield of R? Other than Q.
Feb
9
reviewed No Action Needed Give context-free grammars that generate these languages
Feb
9
comment a and b are integers where gcd(a,b)=p which is a prime. find gcd(a^2,b^2).
By squaring a and b, you do not introduce any additional prime factors.
Feb
8
comment What is does the transformation $[\mathbf{a}]_{\times}$ do?
Aside from its association with the cross product, it is generally known as a Skew-Symmetric Matrix which has several interesting properties. Generally rotations can be encoded in exponental form using these matrices, generally $\mathbf{R}(\mathbf a, \theta) = \exp(\theta[{\mathbf {a}}]_{{\times }})$ where $\theta$ is the angle of rotation, and $\mathbf a$ is a unit vector representing the axis.
Feb
7
comment Physics Vector Problem - Airplane
@JohnHabert, Yes, of course. Good catch... should have sketched it out.
Feb
7
comment Physics Vector Problem - Airplane
It is like the Pythagorean theorem but for general triangles. It is ideal to use when you know two sides and the angle between them to find the third side. In your case the two sides are your two lengths, the angle is 70 degrees.
Feb
7
comment Physics Vector Problem - Airplane
Do you know the law of cosines?