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I am currently a part III student at Cambridge University, England.

I aim to answer what questions I can, understand some of those that I can't and improve the site however I can!


2d
reviewed Close Let $w=1+3i$. Investigate whether $|iw+w|=|iw|+|w|$.
Jan
22
reviewed Leave Open Integral with a compact supported function $0$ indicates the $L^2$ function $0$ almost everywhere
Jan
22
reviewed Close In a group of order 21, every normal subgroup is cyclic
Jan
17
comment What sequence should I study these topics in?
I'd be more than happy to discuss it with you in chat if you like? I've set up a room in chat: "Cambridge discuss room" and will be on it when possible for the next few days.
Dec
29
reviewed Leave Open binomial calculation method
Dec
29
reviewed Leave Open For every $\epsilon>0$, the probability of $W_t>(1+\epsilon)\sqrt{t\log(t)}$ tends to $0$ as $t\to\infty$
Dec
29
reviewed Leave Open Integration with Beta Function $\beta$
Dec
29
reviewed Leave Open Geometry problem on triangles
Dec
29
reviewed Close Simplify ${\Gamma(\beta)\Gamma(u) \over \Gamma(\beta+u)}$
Dec
29
reviewed Leave Open Finite Abelian groups with the same number of elements for all orders are isomorphic
Dec
29
comment Prove that sheaf hom is a sheaf.
@user123412 Yes, in some sense you should. However, since the restriction maps on the morphisms are just "using the same maps but on a smaller domain" then naturality follows from the fact that any $\sigma$ is a morphism, and so satisfies naturality. It is also possibly worth checking in the last step that $\phi(V)$ is a homomorphism, depending on how happy you are with that it really is true.
Dec
25
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
23
awarded  Constituent
Dec
10
awarded  Excavator
Dec
8
awarded  Caucus
Dec
4
comment Irreducible components of affine variety
@Sodan Yes, that's what I meant.
Dec
3
answered Irreducible components of affine variety
Nov
16
comment How to find the splitting field of $X^4-10X^2+1$?
The splitting field of a polynomial over a field (in this case I assume $\mathbb{Q}$) is the smallest field extension in which it splits. If $f(X) \in \mathbb{Q}[X]$ has roots $\alpha_1,\dots,\alpha_n$ then the splitting field is simply $\mathbb{Q}(\alpha_1,\dots,\alpha_n)$. Do you have any other requirements for what the splitting field should look like?
Nov
8
answered Localization of a prime ideal in $\mathbb{Z}/6\mathbb{Z}$
Oct
27
awarded  Pundit