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Apr
22
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
19
comment Understanding Leibniz formula: $D^n (f g) = \sum\limits_{k=0}^{n} \binom{n}{k} D^{n-k}f D^kg$
Thank you for your answer! Much appreciated.
Apr
19
comment Understanding Leibniz formula: $D^n (f g) = \sum\limits_{k=0}^{n} \binom{n}{k} D^{n-k}f D^kg$
Thank you for a great explanation!
Apr
19
accepted Understanding Leibniz formula: $D^n (f g) = \sum\limits_{k=0}^{n} \binom{n}{k} D^{n-k}f D^kg$
Apr
17
comment Define the image of the function $f(x)= 2 \arctan x + \arcsin \frac {2x}{1+x^2}$
can you please show me how you simplify the derivative? I have tried to follow your "simple computation" but with no success.
Apr
12
accepted Define the image of the function $f(x)= 2 \arctan x + \arcsin \frac {2x}{1+x^2}$
Apr
12
comment Define the image of the function $f(x)= 2 \arctan x + \arcsin \frac {2x}{1+x^2}$
Thank you very much for your answer @egreg!
Apr
11
asked Define the image of the function $f(x)= 2 \arctan x + \arcsin \frac {2x}{1+x^2}$
Apr
10
comment Determine the point of intersection between $f(x) = x^2$ and its normal in the point $(a, a^2)$
Thank you very much for your answer!
Apr
10
accepted Determine the point of intersection between $f(x) = x^2$ and its normal in the point $(a, a^2)$
Apr
9
comment Understanding Leibniz formula: $D^n (f g) = \sum\limits_{k=0}^{n} \binom{n}{k} D^{n-k}f D^kg$
Thank you for your comment @Luis. Please explain what you mean in a little bit more detail.
Apr
8
asked Understanding Leibniz formula: $D^n (f g) = \sum\limits_{k=0}^{n} \binom{n}{k} D^{n-k}f D^kg$
Apr
1
asked Determine the point of intersection between $f(x) = x^2$ and its normal in the point $(a, a^2)$
Mar
29
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
25
comment Understanding that both $\lim_{y\to 0} \frac{y}{ln(y+1)}$ and $\lim_{y\to 0} \frac{\ln(y+1)}{y}$ is equal to $1$.
Thank you @George it makes sense!
Mar
25
comment Understanding that both $\lim_{y\to 0} \frac{y}{ln(y+1)}$ and $\lim_{y\to 0} \frac{\ln(y+1)}{y}$ is equal to $1$.
Out of curiosity, I have not seen this operator before $\stackrel{*}{=}$, what does it mean?
Mar
25
comment Understanding that both $\lim_{y\to 0} \frac{y}{ln(y+1)}$ and $\lim_{y\to 0} \frac{\ln(y+1)}{y}$ is equal to $1$.
Thank you for your answer!
Mar
25
accepted Understanding that both $\lim_{y\to 0} \frac{y}{ln(y+1)}$ and $\lim_{y\to 0} \frac{\ln(y+1)}{y}$ is equal to $1$.
Mar
25
asked Understanding that both $\lim_{y\to 0} \frac{y}{ln(y+1)}$ and $\lim_{y\to 0} \frac{\ln(y+1)}{y}$ is equal to $1$.
Mar
21
comment Calculate the limit of: $x_n = \frac{\ln(1+\sqrt{n}+\sqrt[3]{n})}{\ln(1 + \sqrt[3]{n} + \sqrt[4]{n})}$, $n \rightarrow \infty$
Thank you! this was a nice solution that makes sense.