1,185 reputation
623
bio website jacquerie.github.io
location Pisa, Italy
age 27
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen yesterday

I'm a bad student of Mathematics Computer Science, interested in too many things, good in none.


Jan
25
comment What is the name of a graph structure with 'ports'?
In the context of Distributed Systems theory, I've seen it called simply a "graph with a port labeling". Example: goo.gl/w0DmEe
Jan
17
comment Would there be no input or input does not exist?
Unfortunately, the same symbol is used. See here for a definition.
Jan
17
comment Would there be no input or input does not exist?
Are you sure this problem isn't asking about the preimage of $g$, instead of its inverse (which isn't a function)?
Jan
16
awarded  Informed
Jan
16
awarded  Organizer
Jan
16
revised Finding the Optimum Point on a Curve
Graph theory is an unrelated branch of mathematics.
Jan
16
suggested approved edit on Finding the Optimum Point on a Curve
Jan
12
comment What does $ \chi(Tree)\leq 2 $ mean in graph theory?
Let me also add that the quantity you mentioned is called the branching factor, and is sometimes denoted $b$ (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branching_factor).
Jan
12
answered What does $ \chi(Tree)\leq 2 $ mean in graph theory?
Jan
10
comment How to calculate the expected maximum tree size in a pseudoforest
Uh, I just noticed that that product telescopes, which results in a much simpler formula for $C(\tau)$!
Jan
10
comment How to calculate the expected maximum tree size in a pseudoforest
To help your intuition: the numerator assigns the nodes according to the elements of the partition, but we are counting twice some assignments; in particular we count $k!$ times the assignments where $k$ elements of the partition of the same size split the same subset of nodes. Here's similar argument (fourth bullet point): math.stackexchange.com/a/393606/4471
Jan
10
revised How to calculate the expected maximum tree size in a pseudoforest
Fix two typos.
Jan
10
comment How to calculate the expected maximum tree size in a pseudoforest
Almost. $C(\tau)$ is ${n \choose t_1} \cdot {n-t_1 \choose t_2} \cdot {n-t_1-t_2 \choose t_3} \cdot \dots \cdot {n-t_1-\dots-t_{r-1} \choose t_r}$ divided by their multiplicities. That formula has a few typos, which I'm going to fix now.
Jan
9
revised How to calculate the expected maximum tree size in a pseudoforest
Fix mistake.
Jan
9
revised How to calculate the expected maximum tree size in a pseudoforest
Add intuitive explanation of formula.
Jan
9
answered How to calculate the expected maximum tree size in a pseudoforest
Jan
7
accepted Minimal number of moves needed to solve a “Lights Out” variant
Jan
7
comment Minimal number of moves needed to solve a “Lights Out” variant
Thank you for linking to that paper: I had a strong suspicion that this problem was NP-hard, it's nice to see it proven. Thank you also for your code: it's a bit hard to understand completely, but I think I understood the gist of it.
Jan
2
comment Efficient method for finding the number of combinations of values so that the sum is a certain number
Unless your problem has some special structure you can exploit, you're out of luck: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subset_sum_problem
Dec
21
comment How many “good” graphs of size $n$ are there?
Thank you very much for the Additional observations paragraph! I was thinking of submitting another question asking "Why are those two quantities equal?".