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awarded  Popular Question
Apr
3
revised Scaling factor and weights in Unscented Transform (UKF)
added 158 characters in body
Apr
3
revised Scaling factor and weights in Unscented Transform (UKF)
deleted 152 characters in body, correcting errors in my own understanding
Apr
3
revised Scaling factor and weights in Unscented Transform (UKF)
deleted 152 characters in body
Apr
3
revised Scaling factor and weights in Unscented Transform (UKF)
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Apr
2
answered Scaling factor and weights in Unscented Transform (UKF)
Mar
31
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
6
awarded  Informed
Jan
3
revised Relationship between decay of Fourier transform and smoothness in $L^2$
added 86 characters in body
Jan
3
accepted Relationship between decay of Fourier transform and smoothness in $L^2$
Jan
3
comment Relationship between decay of Fourier transform and smoothness in $L^2$
actually can you elaborate on the proof that $\xi \hat{f} \in L^1$?
Jan
3
comment Relationship between decay of Fourier transform and smoothness in $L^2$
Incidentally, integrability lets me complete my method as well via Fubini theorem. Thanks!
Jan
3
comment Relationship between decay of Fourier transform and smoothness in $L^2$
Also, the integral is not a standard integral, but it is an $L^2$ limit of functions of $y$
Jan
3
comment Relationship between decay of Fourier transform and smoothness in $L^2$
How do you show that $L \xi \hat{f}(\xi)$ is integrable?
Jan
3
revised Relationship between decay of Fourier transform and smoothness in $L^2$
added 403 characters in body
Jan
3
comment Relationship between decay of Fourier transform and smoothness in $L^2$
Using which dominating function?
Jan
3
asked Relationship between decay of Fourier transform and smoothness in $L^2$
Dec
29
accepted Computing an infinite trigonometric sum $\sum \frac{2}{n^2 \pi^2} \cos(n \pi x)\cos(n \pi y)$
Dec
23
comment Computing an infinite trigonometric sum $\sum \frac{2}{n^2 \pi^2} \cos(n \pi x)\cos(n \pi y)$
Since we know G(x,y) to be doubly periodic on the plane, we may as well flip your triangle on the line x=y. Then we will have deduced the function for the region y <= x. I think this finishes the question. I have also found the answer using my book's method and I added it as an edit.
Dec
23
revised Computing an infinite trigonometric sum $\sum \frac{2}{n^2 \pi^2} \cos(n \pi x)\cos(n \pi y)$
added 501 characters in body