1,421 reputation
837
bio website
location Valdosta, ga
age 21
visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen Jul 3 at 19:46

I am just a man who has an insatiable desire for knowledge.

"For the rest, brethren, whatever is true, whatever is worthy of reverence and is honorable and seemly, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely and lovable, whatever is kind and winsome and gracious, if there is any virtue and excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think on and weigh and take account of these things [fix your minds on them]."~ Philippians 4:8


Jun
25
comment Considering Vectors Geometrically
You seem to be saying that the geometric picture follows from the way in which vector addition is defined, and the fact that $\mathbb{R}^n$ itself has a geometric interpretation?
Jun
13
comment The role of 'arbitrary' in proofs
I particularly like when you said "This just means we are not assuming anything about x..." That's an interesting idea.
May
23
comment Fourier's Heat Law In Integral Form
Why wouldn't we use Fourier's law to find the total heat flow? I used the Heat Equation (the PDE) to find the temperature distribution $T(x,t)$; then I was going to use Fourier's law to find the total heat flow. Isn't your final equation just the Heat Equation integrated over $x$? I still don't see how that would give the heat flow.
May
23
comment Fourier's Heat Law In Integral Form
I'm sorry, but I do not quite see how I can determine the amount of heat that has flown from (or into) the rod during a certain time interval from the final equation.. Could you help me with that?
Feb
8
comment Integrating With Respect To $x$
So, it would not be correct to use the differential of $y$, $dy = \frac{dy}{dx} dx$?
Dec
28
comment Satisfiability Problem: Determining Which People To Invite
I don't believe that that is so. According to the answer key, which you seem to agree with, if Kanti attends the party, then Samir MUST attend--and there is no exception. But still, the answer key claims that p only if q is the same as q implies p, yet the people who answered my question given in the link state that p only if q is the same as p implies q. Essentially my question is, how can the answer key be correct, it would appear that it is incorrect.
Dec
25
comment Conditional Statements: “only if”
This is a very interesting answer, something of which I was seeking.
Dec
24
comment Conditional Statements: “only if”
Okay, I believe I am beginning to understand now. Thank you.
Dec
24
comment Conditional Statements: “only if”
Why introduce the negations? Isn't that what you are doing, "arbitrarily" introducing negations? Why can't the statement be translated as is?
Dec
24
comment Conditional Statements: “only if”
So, the word "only" introduces a negation? Why is that so?
Dec
24
comment Conditional Statements: “only if”
I have read them carefully, and probably have done so for over a year. I understand what sufficient conditions and necessary conditions are. I understand the conditional relationship in almost all of its forms, except the form "q only if p" What I do not understand is, why is p the necessary condition and q the sufficient condition. I am not asking, what are the sufficient and necessary conditions, rather, I am asking why.
Dec
24
comment Conditional Statements: “only if”
This is the problem I am having. When you have the statement "q if p," it translates to "p implies q;" and this makes sense: q can only be true if p is true. Now, when I see the statement "p only if q," I simply see this as a stronger version of "q if p," and should thus be translated in the same way.
Dec
9
comment Calculus.Integration of definite integral
How come my LateX does not look as appealing as others?
Dec
7
comment Calculus.Integration of definite integral
@Nabla Why would you have to apply it twice? Wouldn't once suffice?
Dec
7
comment Calculus.Integration of definite integral
Is this the integral $\int_{-b}^{b} (\frac{\pi}{a^4})(y^2 - b^2)^4 dy$? I ask, because I am having a little difficulty interpreting what you wrote.
Apr
25
comment Solve for $x$: $4x = 6~(\mod 5)$
@AyushKhaitan What precisely is an integral value?
Apr
25
comment Solve for $x$: $4x = 6~(\mod 5)$
It is? How so?.
Apr
25
comment Solve for $x$: $4x = 6~(\mod 5)$
I don't see that written anywhere in your answer.
Apr
25
comment Solve for $x$: $4x = 6~(\mod 5)$
I'm not quite certain of what you are doing. Are you solving for a specific x-value?
Apr
23
comment Using The Pigeon-Hole Principle
So there difference being less than n--that is, $j - k < n$--proves that when taking the modulus the result is distinct? I'm sorry, I don't quite see it.