1,377 reputation
533
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location Beaumont, TX
age 21
visits member for 1 year, 6 months
seen yesterday

I am just a man who has an insatiable desire for knowledge.

"For the rest, brethren, whatever is true, whatever is worthy of reverence and is honorable and seemly, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely and lovable, whatever is kind and winsome and gracious, if there is any virtue and excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think on and weigh and take account of these things [fix your minds on them]."~ Philippians 4:8


May
12
accepted Counting The Number Of Ways To Seat People At A Table
May
12
accepted Permutation Formula
May
12
accepted Solve for $x$: $4x = 6~(\mod 5)$
May
10
awarded  Caucus
Apr
25
comment Solve for $x$: $4x = 6~(\mod 5)$
@AyushKhaitan What precisely is an integral value?
Apr
25
comment Solve for $x$: $4x = 6~(\mod 5)$
It is? How so?.
Apr
25
comment Solve for $x$: $4x = 6~(\mod 5)$
I don't see that written anywhere in your answer.
Apr
25
comment Solve for $x$: $4x = 6~(\mod 5)$
I'm not quite certain of what you are doing. Are you solving for a specific x-value?
Apr
25
revised Solve for $x$: $4x = 6~(\mod 5)$
edited body
Apr
25
asked Solve for $x$: $4x = 6~(\mod 5)$
Apr
24
asked Permutation Formula
Apr
24
accepted Using The Pigeon-Hole Principle
Apr
23
comment Using The Pigeon-Hole Principle
So there difference being less than n--that is, $j - k < n$--proves that when taking the modulus the result is distinct? I'm sorry, I don't quite see it.
Apr
23
asked Using The Pigeon-Hole Principle
Apr
21
asked Counting The Number Of Ways To Seat People At A Table
Apr
21
comment Probability Distribution Of A Linear Combination
Thank you, that certainly helps for the most part; but how do I find the probability distribution $X+Y$?
Apr
20
asked Standardizing A Random Variable That is Normally Distributed
Apr
20
revised Probability Distribution Of A Linear Combination
added 919 characters in body
Apr
20
comment Probability Distribution Of A Linear Combination
Thank you for the suggest, @jay-sun. I will be edited momentarily.
Apr
20
comment Polar Coordinates: Dividing by the variable “r.”
So, since we integrate $dr$ from 0 to $2\cos\theta$, we don't have to worry about $2\cos\theta$ having to assume the value $r=0$, because the lower limit takes care of that? If this is correct, how can one explain this is fewer indefinite words, that is, explain it more mathematical. Also, what exactly do you mean by making a limit argument?