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seen Mar 14 '13 at 13:57

Oct
11
revised Probability mass function and conditional probabilities
added 182 characters in body
Oct
11
answered Sets forming orthonormal basis
Oct
11
answered Probability mass function and conditional probabilities
Oct
11
comment Probability mass function and conditional probabilities
Just integrate the product w.r.t. $x$ to getthe answer. It is standard way to find marginal density from joint density.
Oct
11
comment Probability mass function and conditional probabilities
Also there is a typo by you, $p_X(x) \cdot p_{Y|X}(y|x)=p_{X,Y}(x,y)$ and not the way you wrote.
Oct
11
comment Linear Algebra Vectors
$2$ points are sufficient to determine a line. You've got two points. If both points satisfy both lines, it means the lines are same as there is a unique line passing through two distinct points.
Oct
11
suggested suggested edit on Closed form for summation involving binomial coefficients.
Oct
11
comment $(m-n\cos y)(m+n\cos x)=m^2 -n^2$ then find $\frac{dy}{dx}$
Hi, Welcome to math.SE.Asking questions is fine, though I can't understand why you need to give unnecessary details about your class,etc. Also you wouldn't have asked for solution if you were not stuck. Please consider changing your title.
Oct
10
revised An angle $\theta$ can be trisected if and only if $4x^3-3x+\cos\theta$ is reducible over $\mathbb{Q}(\cos\theta)$
added 110 characters in body
Oct
10
revised An angle $\theta$ can be trisected if and only if $4x^3-3x+\cos\theta$ is reducible over $\mathbb{Q}(\cos\theta)$
added 309 characters in body
Oct
10
revised An angle $\theta$ can be trisected if and only if $4x^3-3x+\cos\theta$ is reducible over $\mathbb{Q}(\cos\theta)$
misinterpreted the question
Oct
10
answered An angle $\theta$ can be trisected if and only if $4x^3-3x+\cos\theta$ is reducible over $\mathbb{Q}(\cos\theta)$
Oct
9
answered Distribution of Poisson variable conditional on a Gamma variable
Oct
9
awarded  Critic
Oct
8
revised Where are we using $C^1$ in this proof?
error, completely flawed argument.
Oct
8
comment Where are we using $C^1$ in this proof?
yes, sorry. I'll edit my post. Thanks.
Oct
8
comment Where are we using $C^1$ in this proof?
No I wrote, complex differentiability $\iff$ Cauchy Riemann. It is true. Complex differentiability does not imply analyticity. Also the function is right example. Consider $z$ tending to zero with $arg (z) = \frac {\pi}{4}$.
Oct
8
answered Where did $\lambda$ come from?
Oct
8
revised Where are we using $C^1$ in this proof?
example supporting my statement
Oct
8
answered Where are we using $C^1$ in this proof?