1,604 reputation
320
bio website kmlinux.fjfi.cvut.cz/…
location Prague, Czech Republic
age 27
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen yesterday

My former display name: tohecz

Math PhD student at Czech Technical University in Prague and at LIAFA in Paris. At the same time, I'm a typesetter (and partly the copy editor) of one scientific journal (done in LaTeX, of course).

Code licence details applicable on my posts on TeX.SX.

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Aug
1
revised Produce unique number given two integers
added 130 characters in body
Aug
1
answered Produce unique number given two integers
Jun
13
comment Proof of irrationality of a series
+1 very nice, simple, straighforward yet not trivial argument :)
Jun
5
comment Prove $\sqrt6$ is irrational
sorry, corrected. And well, I say that I use stronger weapons, which can be used in a large framework, I know that simpler solutions exist.
Jun
5
revised Prove $\sqrt6$ is irrational
added 2 characters in body
Jun
3
answered What is a Parabolic Fixed Point?
Jun
3
answered Prove $\sqrt6$ is irrational
Jun
3
comment Evaluate a limit (probably involving L'Hôpital rule)
you should use exp in the appropriate places I believe, now you mix e as a number and e(x) as a function.
Mar
31
comment How do I integrate $\frac{1}{x^6+1}$
@MorganWilde Because you have to, the space of polynomials modulo a quadratic polynomial is generated by $1,x$ and not only by $1$.
Mar
31
comment How do I integrate $\frac{1}{x^6+1}$
+1 certainly faster than my approach. It's been a while I knew these tricks, now I remember only the general techniques :-/
Mar
31
comment How do I integrate $\frac{1}{x^6+1}$
@MorganWilde No worries, I added a small tutorial.
Mar
31
revised How do I integrate $\frac{1}{x^6+1}$
added 495 characters in body
Mar
31
answered How do I integrate $\frac{1}{x^6+1}$
Mar
31
comment which axiom(s) are behind the Pythagorean Theorem
@William if $A_1\wedge A_2\wedge\dots\wedge A_n \Leftrightarrow B$, then $B$ is equivalent to the system of axioms $A_1,\dots,A_n$, so I'm no quite sure what you speak to in the second part. And if $A\wedge B\Rightarrow T$ and $A\wedge C\Rightarrow T$ and $A\wedge B\not\Rightarrow C$ and $A\wedge C\not\Rightarrow T$, then you got two non-equivalent proofs of your theorem $T$. I would never "guess" which axioms are "better" in any other way than possibility to derive ones from the others. (But maybe it's just too late and I overlook some stupidity in my arguments.)
Mar
31
comment which axiom(s) are behind the Pythagorean Theorem
Equivalent = Relying the same set of axioms, usually. Therefore a proof that uses less axioms is "better", and a proof that uses different non-equivalent axioms is simply "different".
Mar
28
revised If $\mathbb Z_m\times\mathbb Z_n$ is cyclic, then it's generated by $(\mathrm{gen}(F),\mathrm{gen}(G))$
corrected mn.gcd to mn/gcd
Mar
28
suggested approved edit on If $\mathbb Z_m\times\mathbb Z_n$ is cyclic, then it's generated by $(\mathrm{gen}(F),\mathrm{gen}(G))$
Mar
17
comment Why can't you pick socks using coin flips?
+1 for "countable vs. uncountable".
Mar
2
revised How do I setup the lagrangian for this problem?
added 818 characters in body
Mar
2
revised How do I setup the lagrangian for this problem?
added 425 characters in body