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Mar
11
comment Prove that the complex expression is real
@CiaPan "You don't need an induction in this case" sounds to me like "the story is not complete". I don't buy this.
Mar
10
revised Keep factoring and concatenating to get a prime?
added 45 characters in body
Mar
10
answered Keep factoring and concatenating to get a prime?
Mar
9
comment Induction - Examples where the induction step is correct but the base case is always wrong
This is soooooo good! Thanks for it! It'll go in my Discrete Mathematics problem sessions! :)
Mar
7
comment Would you ever stop rolling the die?
@luegofuego However, as I show, this is not the case, since the series behaves like $~n^2 (1-p)^n$, which is convergent.
Mar
7
revised Would you ever stop rolling the die?
edited body
Mar
7
answered Would you ever stop rolling the die?
Mar
2
comment Proving that $\{u_k\}_{k=1}^\infty$, $u_k=\left\{1,\frac{1}{2},\frac{1}{3},\dots,\frac{1}{k},0,0,\dots\right\}$, does not converge in a metric space
@Scientifica The ping from there has reached me! :)
Mar
2
revised Proving that $\{u_k\}_{k=1}^\infty$, $u_k=\left\{1,\frac{1}{2},\frac{1}{3},\dots,\frac{1}{k},0,0,\dots\right\}$, does not converge in a metric space
added 28 characters in body
Mar
2
comment Proving that $\{u_k\}_{k=1}^\infty$, $u_k=\left\{1,\frac{1}{2},\frac{1}{3},\dots,\frac{1}{k},0,0,\dots\right\}$, does not converge in a metric space
@mercio That seems to be what I'm saying, and it seems to be some bullsh** at the same time. Sorry for that, I'll correct the answer.
Mar
2
revised Notation for difference of two dates
You can see the code for placing the thingy below. If you like it, you can use it in the other occurences.
Mar
2
suggested approved edit on Notation for difference of two dates
Mar
2
comment Proving that $\{u_k\}_{k=1}^\infty$, $u_k=\left\{1,\frac{1}{2},\frac{1}{3},\dots,\frac{1}{k},0,0,\dots\right\}$, does not converge in a metric space
@Reveillark That's really a nit-picking. There's the metric $d$ which extends to $\ell^*$ and defines the topology. I really don't like this type of proofs. Yes, you can prove that the sequence doesn't converge "by hand". But it's much more natural to thing in general terms; find a natural way that would work for all similar sequences.
Mar
2
answered Proving that $\{u_k\}_{k=1}^\infty$, $u_k=\left\{1,\frac{1}{2},\frac{1}{3},\dots,\frac{1}{k},0,0,\dots\right\}$, does not converge in a metric space
Jan
28
comment Is there a notation for being “a finite subset of”?
@Lehs Even though, if the fact that $A\subset B$ was particularly important and crucial for something, and not obvious at the moment in the current context, I would not hesitate much to say: "... because, from (3.14) we see that $A$ is a finite subset of $B$", or something in that manner. You are right that everything can be expressed in symbols, and it should be used as a good tool! Use symbol when appropriate, and accompany them with words when appropriate.
Jan
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
28
comment Is there a notation for being “a finite subset of”?
@Lehs No notation is able to explain an important fact. Only words can.
Jan
27
revised Is there a notation for being “a finite subset of”?
added mathcal to P
Jan
27
revised Is there a notation for being “a finite subset of”?
added 28 characters in body
Jan
27
suggested approved edit on Is there a notation for being “a finite subset of”?