1,403 reputation
214
bio website kmlinux.fjfi.cvut.cz/…
location Prague, Czech Republic
age 27
visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen Jun 27 at 8:08

Math PhD student at Czech Technical University in Prague and at LIAFA in Paris.

Code licence details applicable on my posts on TeX.SX.


Jun
13
comment Proof of irrationality of a series
+1 very nice, simple, straighforward yet not trivial argument :)
Jun
5
comment Prove $\sqrt6$ is irrational
sorry, corrected. And well, I say that I use stronger weapons, which can be used in a large framework, I know that simpler solutions exist.
Jun
5
revised Prove $\sqrt6$ is irrational
added 2 characters in body
Jun
3
answered What is a Parabolic Fixed Point?
Jun
3
answered Prove $\sqrt6$ is irrational
Jun
3
comment Evaluate a limit (probably involving L'Hôpital rule)
you should use exp in the appropriate places I believe, now you mix e as a number and e(x) as a function.
Mar
31
comment How do I integrate $\frac{1}{x^6+1}$
@MorganWilde Because you have to, the space of polynomials modulo a quadratic polynomial is generated by $1,x$ and not only by $1$.
Mar
31
comment How do I integrate $\frac{1}{x^6+1}$
+1 certainly faster than my approach. It's been a while I knew these tricks, now I remember only the general techniques :-/
Mar
31
comment How do I integrate $\frac{1}{x^6+1}$
@MorganWilde No worries, I added a small tutorial.
Mar
31
revised How do I integrate $\frac{1}{x^6+1}$
added 495 characters in body
Mar
31
answered How do I integrate $\frac{1}{x^6+1}$
Mar
31
comment which axiom(s) are behind the Pythagorean Theorem
@William if $A_1\wedge A_2\wedge\dots\wedge A_n \Leftrightarrow B$, then $B$ is equivalent to the system of axioms $A_1,\dots,A_n$, so I'm no quite sure what you speak to in the second part. And if $A\wedge B\Rightarrow T$ and $A\wedge C\Rightarrow T$ and $A\wedge B\not\Rightarrow C$ and $A\wedge C\not\Rightarrow T$, then you got two non-equivalent proofs of your theorem $T$. I would never "guess" which axioms are "better" in any other way than possibility to derive ones from the others. (But maybe it's just too late and I overlook some stupidity in my arguments.)
Mar
31
comment which axiom(s) are behind the Pythagorean Theorem
Equivalent = Relying the same set of axioms, usually. Therefore a proof that uses less axioms is "better", and a proof that uses different non-equivalent axioms is simply "different".
Mar
28
revised If $\mathbb Z_m\times\mathbb Z_n$ is cyclic, then it's generated by $(\mathrm{gen}(F),\mathrm{gen}(G))$
corrected mn.gcd to mn/gcd
Mar
28
suggested suggested edit on If $\mathbb Z_m\times\mathbb Z_n$ is cyclic, then it's generated by $(\mathrm{gen}(F),\mathrm{gen}(G))$
Mar
17
comment Why can't you pick socks using coin flips?
+1 for "countable vs. uncountable".
Mar
2
revised How do I setup the lagrangian for this problem?
added 818 characters in body
Mar
2
revised How do I setup the lagrangian for this problem?
added 425 characters in body
Mar
2
comment How do I setup the lagrangian for this problem?
@Spacey This is analytical. You always need to treat the boundary seperately. Remember that $y(x)=2x$ has to global maximum, still it has a maximum in $[0,1]$, attained at $2$. You can actually construct Lagrangians for each of the boundary point, but the domains of these are single points, so it's a non-sense to do.
Mar
2
comment How do I setup the lagrangian for this problem?
Well, you simply search (by the derivatives method) for maxima inside $(0,2\pi/3)$, let's call it $y_M$. Then the maximum you look for is simply $\max(y_M, y(0), y(2\pi/3))$.