151 reputation
6
bio website noneforthemoment..
location San Diego, CA
age 24
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen May 20 at 7:21

I am a Computer Engineering Student, that likes to think of creative and different solutions to problems, and loves pizza with bacon and pineapple.


Nov
17
awarded  Promoter
Oct
13
awarded  Tumbleweed
Oct
6
asked Newton-Horner Method Example
Nov
29
awarded  Supporter
Nov
25
asked How to know if it diverges or converges and finding the convergent value
Dec
8
comment getting the x,y, and z angle of two points?
Glad to help. =)
Dec
7
revised getting the x,y, and z angle of two points?
Added information and also made it clearer.
Dec
7
answered getting the x,y, and z angle of two points?
Dec
7
revised Analytic Geometry | Two Planes and a Angle | Two Solutions
Added a missing D in the semilast formula. (Before the dots.)
Dec
7
comment Analytic Geometry | Two Planes and a Angle | Two Solutions
@Hans Lundmark, thanks for the explanation,now I get it, but after reading and reading Robin Chapman's statement, it seems that he is saying something that the problem says in it's legend, that is: "That the director numbers of the plane that I'm looking for are orthogonal to the line segment $P_1 P_2$ and that it forms a $60^\circ$ (\frac{\pi}{3}) angle with the known plane's normal... or Maybe I'm missing the point, did anyone look at what I already did?
Dec
5
revised Analytic Geometry | Two Planes and a Angle | Two Solutions
edited tags
Dec
5
comment Analytic Geometry | Two Planes and a Angle | Two Solutions
That's where I lost you, how can it be orthogonal at $60^\circ$, if in order to be orthogonal it must be a $90^\circ$, where should I use the $60^\circ$?, thank you for your reply and patience by the way.
Dec
5
comment Analytic Geometry | Two Planes and a Angle | Two Solutions
Well, your statement helped me find $A(C)$ using the perpendicularity theorem, but it just gives me a known fact: Director numbers of $l:[1,0,3]$ $$A(1)+B(0)+C(3)=0$$ we get: $$A=-3C$$
Dec
5
awarded  Autobiographer
Dec
5
comment Analytic Geometry | Two Planes and a Angle | Two Solutions
@J.M. Hehe thanks I find it fun to use Tex (or LaTeX) syntax, love to see it render..
Dec
5
asked Analytic Geometry | Two Planes and a Angle | Two Solutions
Dec
2
comment Equation of plane passing containing the intersection of other two planes, with a fixed distance to the origin.
why no $\pm$ sign, the process of transforming from the general form to the normal form involves dividing by $r=\pm \sqrt{A^2+B^2+C^2}$, thats how we know that $$2=\frac{2(2k-1)}{\pm \sqrt{A^2+B^2+C^2}}$$ and the sign of $r$ is determined by the theorem I mention.
Dec
2
comment Equation of plane passing containing the intersection of other two planes, with a fixed distance to the origin.
@Arturo Magidin Yeah, corrected again the equation, sorry, it was a bit awkward writing in Tex, I hope I don't have any errors now, thank you for your patience.
Dec
2
comment Equation of plane passing containing the intersection of other two planes, with a fixed distance to the origin.
@Moron thank you for the welcome.
Dec
2
revised Equation of plane passing containing the intersection of other two planes, with a fixed distance to the origin.
Fixed some error in formulas.