151 reputation
7
bio website noneforthemoment..
location San Diego, CA
age 24
visits member for 4 years
seen May 20 at 7:21

I am a Computer Engineering Student, that likes to think of creative and different solutions to problems, and loves pizza with bacon and pineapple.


1d
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
17
awarded  Promoter
Oct
13
awarded  Tumbleweed
Oct
6
asked Newton-Horner Method Example
Nov
29
awarded  Supporter
Nov
25
asked How to know if it diverges or converges and finding the convergent value
Dec
8
comment getting the x,y, and z angle of two points?
Glad to help. =)
Dec
7
revised getting the x,y, and z angle of two points?
Added information and also made it clearer.
Dec
7
answered getting the x,y, and z angle of two points?
Dec
7
revised Analytic Geometry | Two Planes and a Angle | Two Solutions
Added a missing D in the semilast formula. (Before the dots.)
Dec
7
comment Analytic Geometry | Two Planes and a Angle | Two Solutions
@Hans Lundmark, thanks for the explanation,now I get it, but after reading and reading Robin Chapman's statement, it seems that he is saying something that the problem says in it's legend, that is: "That the director numbers of the plane that I'm looking for are orthogonal to the line segment $P_1 P_2$ and that it forms a $60^\circ$ (\frac{\pi}{3}) angle with the known plane's normal... or Maybe I'm missing the point, did anyone look at what I already did?
Dec
5
revised Analytic Geometry | Two Planes and a Angle | Two Solutions
edited tags
Dec
5
comment Analytic Geometry | Two Planes and a Angle | Two Solutions
That's where I lost you, how can it be orthogonal at $60^\circ$, if in order to be orthogonal it must be a $90^\circ$, where should I use the $60^\circ$?, thank you for your reply and patience by the way.
Dec
5
comment Analytic Geometry | Two Planes and a Angle | Two Solutions
Well, your statement helped me find $A(C)$ using the perpendicularity theorem, but it just gives me a known fact: Director numbers of $l:[1,0,3]$ $$A(1)+B(0)+C(3)=0$$ we get: $$A=-3C$$
Dec
5
awarded  Autobiographer
Dec
5
comment Analytic Geometry | Two Planes and a Angle | Two Solutions
@J.M. Hehe thanks I find it fun to use Tex (or LaTeX) syntax, love to see it render..
Dec
5
asked Analytic Geometry | Two Planes and a Angle | Two Solutions
Dec
2
comment Equation of plane passing containing the intersection of other two planes, with a fixed distance to the origin.
why no $\pm$ sign, the process of transforming from the general form to the normal form involves dividing by $r=\pm \sqrt{A^2+B^2+C^2}$, thats how we know that $$2=\frac{2(2k-1)}{\pm \sqrt{A^2+B^2+C^2}}$$ and the sign of $r$ is determined by the theorem I mention.
Dec
2
comment Equation of plane passing containing the intersection of other two planes, with a fixed distance to the origin.
@Arturo Magidin Yeah, corrected again the equation, sorry, it was a bit awkward writing in Tex, I hope I don't have any errors now, thank you for your patience.
Dec
2
comment Equation of plane passing containing the intersection of other two planes, with a fixed distance to the origin.
@Moron thank you for the welcome.