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Just a bitch


Jul
17
awarded  Altruist
Jul
17
comment The standard role of intuitive numbers in the foundations of mathematics
the answer is not good (ACTUALLY A PIECE OF CRAP) but I am giving the bounty to the worst answer, so you win! congratulations!
Jul
17
revised Proof correctness problem
added 175 characters in body
Jul
17
answered Proof correctness problem
Jul
15
comment “I have found a dead body on my car.”
sorry, Roy's answer appeared again!
Jul
15
answered “I have found a dead body on my car.”
Jul
15
comment “I have found a dead body on my car.”
I agree with Roy, your statement is just false if you include as true the fact that "yuo do not own any car". No further impications.
Jul
14
comment Probability and Axiom of Choice
OK, let us say that the sets consists of actually N identical balls. Well you know they are not identical because you can brake them and they have a label (n) inside. But you will only use or know the labels after you put the chosen balls in the Black box. I am abusing AC?
Jul
14
comment Probability and Axiom of Choice
Or I am not allowed to "fix" that?
Jul
14
comment Probability and Axiom of Choice
Assume the choice function treats all the elements of N as unlabeled, or undiferentiated, so the function looks truly random.
Jul
14
comment Probability and Axiom of Choice
I still tend to see them as related, and I'll give you an example of why. Please let me know what is wrong in my construction.How I believe you can use AC to build a random number generator: Supposse we have $\omega$ well ordered copies of the set N. We fix a choice function that will pick one element of each set. Then put the chosen numbers in the same order than the copies of N, within a black box. Then by definition my "natural number generator" box will generate a sequence of natural numbers. If this were possible to imagine,do I have any expectations about the distribution probability?
Jul
14
comment Apparent Paradox in the Idea of Random Numbers
Can you imagine an Turing machine oracle? I know it doesn't exist but it is not that difficult. I think I am asking something at the same level of existentiality
Jul
14
comment Apparent Paradox in the Idea of Random Numbers
Can at least you imagine a machine that implement a random choice function (has to pick a random natural for each of $\omega$ copies of the naturals). Do you expect some a priori probability distribution for the numbers generated this way?
Jul
14
comment Apparent Paradox in the Idea of Random Numbers
What if I do not care a bout probabilities? Can I still invoke the axiom of choice? Or, actually, this would be the question: what is the distribution law associated to a machine that picks truly randomly (I mean, as determined by AC).
Jul
13
awarded  Tenacious
Jul
13
comment How would you change math notation?
They all serve a very well role in physics, at least at the undergraduate level. That is why should keep it, until you find something better
Jul
13
comment Normal number generator with digit extraction algorithm?
@hardmat "In predictable order" tell us all! It can be compressed, so it not truly random (although it could perhaps past a test of normalcy)
Jul
12
answered Does counting make sense?
Jul
12
comment Normal number generator with digit extraction algorithm?
@hardmath your example is not a normal number at all!! (I do not even get the positive vote)
Jul
12
comment Normal number generator with digit extraction algorithm?
I do not think there is any known computable number known to be normal (only suspected, such as $\pi$, $e$ and $\sqrt 2$)