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seen Nov 7 at 20:24

Oct
5
comment Is there a way to depict using matrix operations or equivalent, the practice of z-culling in a 3D-to-2D render algorithm
@DevKanchen There is nothing un-mathematical about an algorithmn... In fact, you can translate any algorithm into a system of (recursively) defined functions which use nothing but 0, 1 and "+".
Oct
5
comment Is there a way to depict using matrix operations or equivalent, the practice of z-culling in a 3D-to-2D render algorithm
@DevKanchen I've extended my answer to explain how a $z$-Buffer is used to deal with (partially) occluded objects. This is the most general technique (that I know of) to deal with occlusion -- most other techniques like culling are simply optimizations that are done on top of that...
Oct
5
revised Is there a way to depict using matrix operations or equivalent, the practice of z-culling in a 3D-to-2D render algorithm
added 1850 characters in body
Oct
5
revised Is there a way to depict using matrix operations or equivalent, the practice of z-culling in a 3D-to-2D render algorithm
deleted 1 character in body
Oct
5
answered Is there a way to depict using matrix operations or equivalent, the practice of z-culling in a 3D-to-2D render algorithm
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
28
awarded  Yearling
Sep
9
answered What does “finding an element” in $\mathbb Z_n$ mean?
Sep
9
comment Give the transformations of the following functions.
Just pick three points from each of the three cases. Your cases are (a) $x$ is less than $.3$, (b) $x$ is between $-3$ and $3$, (c) $x$ is greater than $3$. For (a), $x=-6,-5,-4$ might be a good choice. Now pick values for cases (b) and (c), and compute $h(x)$ for the 9 points you picked!
Sep
9
revised Showing that this is a measure
added 609 characters in body
Sep
8
revised Showing that this is a measure
Fixed formatting
Sep
8
answered Showing that this is a measure
Jul
27
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
27
awarded  Nice Answer
May
25
comment An equation that generates a beautiful or unique shape for motivating students in mathematics
There ain't any cooler equation than this one ;-)
May
25
answered Is the operator $A$ self-adjoint? unitary? normal?
May
24
awarded  Nice Answer
May
21
comment If $F$ is a closed nowhere dense subset of $\mathbb{R}$, and I define $f_n(x) = \frac{1}{n}$ for $x \in F$, is $f_n(x)$ continuous?
Continuous on what set? If $f_n$ is supposed to be a map from $\mathbb{R}$ to $\mathbb{R}$, then how is $f_n$ defined for $x \notin F$? Is $f_n$ zero there? If you view $f_n$ as a map from $F$ to $\mathbb{R}$, then $f$ is certainly continuous because it is constant.
May
21
comment Can you find a ellipse so that its image is a circle?
@mesel Ah, OK, I think I see what you want. You want a projection onto $P$ in the $z$-direction, i.e. You map $(x,y,0)$ to $(x,y,1-x-y)$, right?
May
21
comment Can you find a ellipse so that its image is a circle?
@mesel Yes, but what are the constraints on this transform $F$? You can, for example, find a rotation+translation that maps the $xy$-plane into $P$, and the problem is trivial then, since rotations and translations map circles to circles. But that's quite certainly not what you want. The minimal requirement you probably want to impose is probably that $F$ is idempotent, meaning that applying it twice is the same as applying it once. That makes $F$ a projection. But there are still many such projections (because you can pick the direction the light comes from)...