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seen Dec 30 '13 at 21:45

Jan
14
awarded  Yearling
May
7
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
29
accepted Calculating the rotations necessary to make a 2D object match the perspective of a plane in 3D space
Jun
26
comment Calculating the rotations necessary to make a 2D object match the perspective of a plane in 3D space
A few disclaimers: Yes, I'm in way over my head on the math. Yes, I know that Illustrator and Photoshop have easier ways to do this without doing math. I don't care; I want to know how to do it properly for my personal enrichment. It's possible that I simply didn't do the right combination of simple math on the original angles; sorry if that's the case. Yes, I know that my title sucks and that I may not have used the right words about stuff like the kind of projection being used. Please feel free to edit my question to be more coherent and discoverable.
Jun
26
asked Calculating the rotations necessary to make a 2D object match the perspective of a plane in 3D space
Nov
26
awarded  Yearling
Jul
21
revised How do you read this logical statement aloud, and how do you notate it in symbols?
Made myself sound like less of an idiot. Didn't change the substance of the question.
Jul
20
awarded  Supporter
Jul
20
awarded  Scholar
Jul
20
accepted How do you read this logical statement aloud, and how do you notate it in symbols?
Jul
20
comment How do you read this logical statement aloud, and how do you notate it in symbols?
Alas, it's simply a matter of priorities. This is likely to be the only time in my life that the ability to read and construct logic notation will be useful to me. And as you might guess, the answer to a question pertaining to a work of Harry Potter fanfic is on the outskirts of any reasonable definition of "useful" to begin with. In any case, I doubt there are many questions on the Stack Exchange network that could not be answered after several hours of the askers' time; yet curiously, there are still plenty of people who are happy to answer questions here.
Jul
19
awarded  Student
Jul
19
asked How do you read this logical statement aloud, and how do you notate it in symbols?
Jul
7
comment Mathematical difference between white and black notes in a piano
@BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft: There are many ways of expressing how the Major scale is constructed. Here's my favorite: If the fundamental pitch of an instrument is a C1, the first overtone is C2; then G2, C3, E3, G3. So the first 3 unique pitches in this harmonic series are C, E, and G; a pleasant-sounding chord called a major triad. All harmonic series yield major triads this way. Take a pitch, a perfect 5th above it, and a perfect 5th below it, and construct major triads off each note. The unique pitches in that set are the major scale.
Mar
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
27
revised Mathematical difference between white and black notes in a piano
added 3 characters in body
Nov
27
revised Mathematical difference between white and black notes in a piano
added 15 characters in body
Nov
26
awarded  Editor
Nov
26
revised Mathematical difference between white and black notes in a piano
added 234 characters in body
Nov
26
comment Mathematical difference between white and black notes in a piano
I think Locrian is awesome because it's the weirdest sounding mode; it begins with a semitone and doesn't include the perfect fifth above the root. It might not actually be my favorite one to listen to, but it's definitely the weirdest and most unique. As for your point B, I guess I did leave it somewhat implicit; the white keys by themselves play a certain set of diatonic scales, and the black keys are the remaining five pitches not included in that set.