481 reputation
317
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Sep 13 '13 at 23:49

Oct
10
comment How can gender and class classification be dependent?
Ross, thank you for your answer! I upvoted everyone who contributed, honestly I still don't quite get it. but it's pretty late tonight. I'll think more on each answer when i wake up tomorrow morning.
Oct
10
comment How can gender and class classification be dependent?
oh no =( this is so convoluted. I started a post before on how I can identify a probability problem as a conditional probability problem(math.stackexchange.com/questions/205103/…). it seems like you're suggesting they're the same. this is still confusing =(
Oct
10
comment How can gender and class classification be dependent?
why would you think of this in terms of conditional probability? I'm thinking it's simple union and interects
Oct
9
revised How can gender and class classification be dependent?
deleted 7 characters in body
Oct
9
comment How can gender and class classification be dependent?
If, however, the first die landed on 6, we would be unhappy because we would no longer have a chance of getting a total of 6. In other words, our chance of getting a total of 6 depends on the outcome of the first die; thus, E1 and F cannot be independent. So is there an explanation like this for class and gender?
Oct
9
revised How can gender and class classification be dependent?
deleted 46 characters in body
Oct
9
revised How can gender and class classification be dependent?
deleted 13 characters in body
Oct
9
comment How can gender and class classification be dependent?
@QiaochuYuan Suppose that we toss 2 fair dice. Let E1 denote the event that the sum of the dice is 6 and F denote the event that the first die equals 4. Hence, E1 and F are not independent. Realistically, the reason for this is clear because if we are interested in the possibility of throwing a 6 (with 2 dice), we shall be quite happy if the first die lands on 4 (or, indeed, on any of the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5), for then we shall still have a possibility of getting a total of 6.
Oct
9
revised How can gender and class classification be dependent?
deleted 4 characters in body
Oct
9
asked How can gender and class classification be dependent?
Oct
9
accepted Why does negative binomial random variable uses ${n-1 \choose r-1}$ instead of ${n \choose r}$ as coefficient?
Oct
7
accepted Why can we use poisson distribution in this case? the n is very small!!
Oct
7
comment Probability given a mean and standard deviation of a random variable
@DilipSarwate had the distribution been normal, i'd have been right?
Oct
7
comment Probability given a mean and standard deviation of a random variable
@DilipSarwate sorry, i take that back. I think i had assumed the distribution to be normal...
Oct
7
answered Probability given a mean and standard deviation of a random variable
Oct
7
comment Why can we use poisson distribution in this case? the n is very small!!
are you sure $\begin{equation} \frac{n(n-1)\ldots(n-k+1)}{n^n} \approx 1 \end{equation}$? because (by looking at how it's derived) the denominator is $k!$
Oct
6
asked Why can we use poisson distribution in this case? the n is very small!!
Oct
6
comment Is it possible to do this Poisson problem in Binomial?
ive added the second part of the problem, can you help convert that into binomial? Thank you very much!!
Oct
6
revised Is it possible to do this Poisson problem in Binomial?
added 97 characters in body
Oct
6
comment Is it possible to do this Poisson problem in Binomial?
i got it! going back to question (a) i tried to find the prob $(\frac{364}{365})^{80000}$ why is that wrong?