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Oct
11
comment By convention $P[X=x] = 0$ for all x. How would you explain pdf $f(x) =3x^2$ (where x is between 0 and 1) when x =0.9
@chris ok, i see. then what do i get when I plug in 0.9 for x?
Oct
11
revised By convention $P[X=x] = 0$ for all x. How would you explain pdf $f(x) =3x^2$ (where x is between 0 and 1) when x =0.9
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Oct
11
comment By convention $P[X=x] = 0$ for all x. How would you explain pdf $f(x) =3x^2$ (where x is between 0 and 1) when x =0.9
ok, when $x =0.9$ then $f(0.9)= 3(0.9)^2 which \neq 0$. That's what I'm trying to ask
Oct
11
asked By convention $P[X=x] = 0$ for all x. How would you explain pdf $f(x) =3x^2$ (where x is between 0 and 1) when x =0.9
Oct
10
revised How can gender and class classification be dependent?
edited title
Oct
10
comment How can gender and class classification be dependent?
Ross, thank you for your answer! I upvoted everyone who contributed, honestly I still don't quite get it. but it's pretty late tonight. I'll think more on each answer when i wake up tomorrow morning.
Oct
10
comment How can gender and class classification be dependent?
oh no =( this is so convoluted. I started a post before on how I can identify a probability problem as a conditional probability problem(math.stackexchange.com/questions/205103/…). it seems like you're suggesting they're the same. this is still confusing =(
Oct
10
comment How can gender and class classification be dependent?
why would you think of this in terms of conditional probability? I'm thinking it's simple union and interects
Oct
9
revised How can gender and class classification be dependent?
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Oct
9
comment How can gender and class classification be dependent?
If, however, the first die landed on 6, we would be unhappy because we would no longer have a chance of getting a total of 6. In other words, our chance of getting a total of 6 depends on the outcome of the first die; thus, E1 and F cannot be independent. So is there an explanation like this for class and gender?
Oct
9
revised How can gender and class classification be dependent?
deleted 46 characters in body
Oct
9
revised How can gender and class classification be dependent?
deleted 13 characters in body
Oct
9
comment How can gender and class classification be dependent?
@QiaochuYuan Suppose that we toss 2 fair dice. Let E1 denote the event that the sum of the dice is 6 and F denote the event that the first die equals 4. Hence, E1 and F are not independent. Realistically, the reason for this is clear because if we are interested in the possibility of throwing a 6 (with 2 dice), we shall be quite happy if the first die lands on 4 (or, indeed, on any of the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5), for then we shall still have a possibility of getting a total of 6.
Oct
9
revised How can gender and class classification be dependent?
deleted 4 characters in body
Oct
9
asked How can gender and class classification be dependent?
Oct
9
accepted Why does negative binomial random variable uses ${n-1 \choose r-1}$ instead of ${n \choose r}$ as coefficient?
Oct
7
accepted Why can we use poisson distribution in this case? the n is very small!!
Oct
7
comment Probability given a mean and standard deviation of a random variable
@DilipSarwate had the distribution been normal, i'd have been right?
Oct
7
comment Probability given a mean and standard deviation of a random variable
@DilipSarwate sorry, i take that back. I think i had assumed the distribution to be normal...
Oct
7
answered Probability given a mean and standard deviation of a random variable