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Mar
28
accepted Why do Fibonacci numbers appear in stock market tick charts?
Mar
27
comment Why do Fibonacci numbers appear in stock market tick charts?
I highly appreciate the effort you've made to post your theory.
Mar
27
comment Why do Fibonacci numbers appear in stock market tick charts?
Thank you for the plausible and well explained theory.
Mar
27
awarded  Benefactor
Mar
27
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Mar
22
comment Why do Fibonacci numbers appear in stock market tick charts?
That can also be a valid answer, but that does not render the question vacuous. There is no reason why in principle there would not be a mathematical logic behind the Fibonacci numbers.
Mar
20
awarded  Promoter
Mar
14
asked Why do Fibonacci numbers appear in stock market tick charts?
Aug
15
awarded  Yearling
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Aug
15
awarded  Yearling
Jul
20
comment How does one show a topological space is metrizable? Using text Intro. to Topo. by Mendelson
Hausdorff is one of the separation axioms. You'll get to that later.
Jul
20
answered How does one show a topological space is metrizable? Using text Intro. to Topo. by Mendelson
Jul
14
comment Definition of the fundamental group
It won't be even associative. The proof of associativeness and many other qualities uses homotopy between the source and outcome loops.
Jul
13
accepted Is $\{ a-b=y, a \oplus b=x \}$ solvable?
Jul
13
comment Is $\{ a-b=y, a \oplus b=x \}$ solvable?
maybe in other cases, where a cannot be b so x,y cannot be 0?
Jul
13
asked Is $\{ a-b=y, a \oplus b=x \}$ solvable?
Jul
5
accepted If the * of morphisms (poly. maps) are equal, are the morphisms equal?
Jul
5
comment If the * of morphisms (poly. maps) are equal, are the morphisms equal?
Great! is there a consequence for the fact that there is a fully faithful functor between those (or any two) categories?
Jul
5
comment If the * of morphisms (poly. maps) are equal, are the morphisms equal?
For $t:X\rightarrow Y$, then $t_*:k[Y]\rightarrow k[x] : t_*(f(x))=f(t(x))$, so $t_*$ is a morphism between rings as is $\tau$, and * is the functor. But as I said, we never used words like functor in the lecture so I might be wrong about my definitions.