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Feb
9
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
8
asked Proof of the bigon criterion
Jan
4
reviewed Approve How to find the inverse of this matrix?
Jan
2
answered Not understanding division in Birthday Paradox
Dec
28
accepted Is there a “nice” discontinuous, bijective homomorphism $f: (\mathbb{R},+) \to (\mathbb{R},+)$?
Dec
28
asked Is there a “nice” discontinuous, bijective homomorphism $f: (\mathbb{R},+) \to (\mathbb{R},+)$?
Dec
15
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
15
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
25
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
21
awarded  Yearling
Aug
31
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
12
answered Does limit exist for the following expression?
Aug
11
comment Area between the curve and x-axis
Hi stuart, I see you have already asked a few questions, most of which have received good answers. If you're satisfied with an answer, you can not only upvote it, but also accept it by using the little check mark right below the up- and downvote arrows. This lets whoever answered your question know that you are indeed satisfied with the answer, and it helps people spot questions which still need more attention. :)
Aug
11
revised Area under a curve subintervals
added 34 characters in body
Aug
11
revised Area under a curve subintervals
added 20 characters in body
Aug
11
answered Area under a curve subintervals
Aug
11
comment Differential geometry: $|\alpha(t)|=c\ne 0 \iff \langle \alpha(t),\alpha'(t)\rangle = 0,\forall t\in I$
Yes, both summands on the LHS of your equation are equal because of symmetry of the inner product, so they must both be zero. You can basically go along the exact same chain of thought - but backwards - to get the other direction of the statement you want to prove.
Aug
11
answered Differential geometry: $|\alpha(t)|=c\ne 0 \iff \langle \alpha(t),\alpha'(t)\rangle = 0,\forall t\in I$
Aug
11
comment Linear map with polynomials - Find a matrix
That's correct. And what does a linear combination of the elements of the set $\{1,x,x^2,x^3\}$ look like?