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visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen Sep 15 at 3:55

I'm an electrical engineering major. I love going to Radio Shack, or ordering from Jameco, and building various, small electronics to impress others and for general curiosity.

My favorite subject I'd have to say, though, is physics. Could go on for hours about it. I may get my masters in physics after being an electrical engineer for a while.

I also love classical music. I wasted a lot of time in the music department, but I loved the community and playing classical guitar at recitals. It may end up taking 5 or 6 years to get my bachelors but that's ok.


Sep
15
comment $\displaystyle \frac{d}{dx}2^x$ where $x=0$
@Shahar Yes {need more characters}
Sep
15
comment $\displaystyle \frac{d}{dx}2^x$ where $x=0$
@user164587 Haha, I hadn't ever noticed that. I'm in Calc 1 and we still use log as base 10 if not specified. And most, if not all calculators, naturally use base 10
Sep
14
comment Prove rigorously: $\displaystyle \lim_{x\rightarrow 2}x^2+5x=14$
So it's like squaring both sides? (But multiplying by equivalents)
Sep
13
comment Prove rigorously: $\displaystyle \lim_{x\rightarrow 2}x^2+5x=14$
How did you find $|x-2||x+7|<(9+ \delta)\delta $?
Sep
12
comment Prove rigorously: $\displaystyle \lim_{x\rightarrow 2}x^2+5x=14$
$\delta>|x-2|$?
Sep
11
comment Derivative at 4, when $f(x)=\frac{1}{\sqrt{2x+1}}$
There was an error in my question (wrong function). This is relevant. Sorry for the confusion
Sep
11
comment Derivative at 4, when $f(x)=\frac{1}{\sqrt{2x+1}}$
yes there is an error. will fix in a moment
Sep
7
comment Simplifying compound fraction: $\frac{3}{\sqrt{5}/5}$
I know this an old question, but if you had simply changed your √5/5 to a √5/√5, you would've got 3√5÷5/5 and gotten your answer. The whole point of multiplying a complex faction by a number to simplify it is to times it by 1 (√5/√5 in this case) because multiplying anything by 1 is the same thing.
Aug
24
comment verify $\lim_{x\rightarrow0}(4x^2+2x+5)=5$
ok I think $|x||4x+2|$ is the answer my professor is looking for
Aug
23
comment verify $\lim_{x\rightarrow0}(4x^2+2x+5)=5$
We haven't gotten to delta-epsilon proofs yet
Aug
23
comment verify $\lim_{x\rightarrow0}(4x^2+2x+5)=5$
Actually that is in the next section of our book, on limit laws. We are not supposed to use those. But I see that that is an acceptable answer otherwise
Aug
23
comment verify $\lim_{x\rightarrow0}(4x^2+2x+5)=5$
That wouldn't be a "proof"
Aug
19
comment Suppose that $|x-4|\leq1 $
Ah I hadn't thought of solving it that way. I'm sure that will save me some time in the future
Aug
18
comment Suppose that $|x-4|\leq1 $
Did you see my edit? I think I did it right. Oh the absolute bars
Aug
18
comment Suppose that $|x-4|\leq1 $
the book's wrong or my method?
Aug
18
comment Suppose that $|x-4|\leq1 $
That's just for (a) though, right? I need (b)
Aug
17
comment Find all values $c$ such that $(x+1)/(x^2+2cx+4)$ has domain R
Actually my book wrote it with just a bold "R". I know what that symbols means but I just wanted to be accurate. That was most of my confusion
Aug
17
comment Find all values $c$ such that $(x+1)/(x^2+2cx+4)$ has domain R
Ok that's actually what I thought it meant but wasn't sure because it was just a bold R. So if I'm right I just solve for "the discriminate is less than 0"?
Aug
17
comment Find all values $c$ such that $(x+1)/(x^2+2cx+4)$ has domain R
Huh. Why is the homework tag being removed?
Aug
13
comment Find domain and range of $(f \circ g)$ for $f(x)=\ln x$ and $g(x)=x^2−1$
but I have to find the domain and range. Is what I wrote in the edit correct?