262 reputation
212
bio website linkedin.com/profile/…
location Colchester, United Kingdom
age 21
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Jul 20 at 7:47

The eternal student, developer and open source enthusiast, who is keen on technology with a focus in education.


Aug
19
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Apr
9
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
13
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
7
awarded  Yearling
Mar
22
comment nth degree interpolating polynomials
Thank you for explanation!
Mar
22
accepted nth degree interpolating polynomials
Mar
22
asked nth degree interpolating polynomials
Jan
24
awarded  Enthusiast
Jan
21
comment Function which gradually rises until some point and then quickly “falls”
Thank you! The second modification is what I wanted.
Jan
21
comment Function which gradually rises until some point and then quickly “falls”
Thank you, that's interesting!
Jan
21
comment Function which gradually rises until some point and then quickly “falls”
Thank you for the answer! I meant single function, not piecewise.
Jan
21
accepted Function which gradually rises until some point and then quickly “falls”
Jan
21
comment Function which gradually rises until some point and then quickly “falls”
@IanMateus That is not necessary.
Jan
21
asked Function which gradually rises until some point and then quickly “falls”
Jan
17
awarded  Nice Question
Nov
24
accepted Proof of sequence limit, using epsilon-delta method.
Nov
24
comment Proof of sequence limit, using epsilon-delta method.
Thank you, I hope I finally figured it out with the priceless help of SE mathematicians. :)
Nov
24
comment Proof of sequence limit, using epsilon-delta method.
Thank you! One elaboration: is ${\lceil\frac{1}{\epsilon^2}\rceil}$ means integer part without rounding it or it is the next integer, which is larger or equal to ${\frac{1}{\epsilon^2}}$?
Nov
24
comment Proof of sequence limit, using epsilon-delta method.
Thank you for such a consistent and complete answer!