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Aug
30
comment Monty Hall problem again (from Grimmet and Stirzaker)
I think it might be worth editing your question and mentioning that your calculation is an attempt to answer the question the authors intended to ask, rather than the one they did ask (as evidenced by the change in wording in the 4th edition). I wouldn't change the text you have, since the comments refer to it, but maybe add something at the end. I was confused about this point for quite a while, and imagine future readers might be as well.
Aug
30
comment finding the error pattern from the syndrome
@leonbloy: I've added it as an answer (expanded slightly).
Aug
30
answered finding the error pattern from the syndrome
Aug
29
comment finding the error pattern from the syndrome
We can't. To correct one error, the minimum distance has to be $3$. But in a code whose parity check matrix has identical columns, there are codewords of weight $2$, and the minimum distance is therefore at most $2$. In this particular code, $01001$ is a codeword of weight $2$.
Aug
24
awarded  Good Question
Aug
20
comment Relation between number of unique values in Gramian Matrix (G) and the matrices that created it
Now in OEIS: A259363.
Aug
19
revised Application of Pigeon-Hole Principle to balls in bins.
eliminate use of the same symbol for two different quantities
Aug
19
revised Application of Pigeon-Hole Principle to balls in bins.
added 1086 characters in body
Aug
19
revised Application of Pigeon-Hole Principle to balls in bins.
added 165 characters in body
Aug
19
answered Application of Pigeon-Hole Principle to balls in bins.
Aug
19
comment Application of Pigeon-Hole Principle to balls in bins.
@lulu: $<$ makes sense given your hint.
Aug
14
comment What is the name of this proof of, “$\sqrt{2}$ is irrational”?
Knowledge of something like the proof in your P.P.S. is strongly hinted at in the writings of Aristotle. If there's still interest--I know this question is old, but it recently got bumped--I will try to locate it and post an excerpt of the passage I have in mind.
Aug
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
7
comment Probability and Statistics Binomials distribution
@BenedictVoltaire: in spite of all this, the method for finding $x$ in your answer seems to be the same as mine. What value of $x$ would you get if you applied your method to my example problem?
Aug
7
comment Probability and Statistics Binomials distribution
@BenedictVoltaire: I've reread your comment, but am still not getting the point. Assuming 0.05 was meant to be 0.5, why do you say that we don't want the probability to be smaller than 0.5, but we do want 0.5? In the definition of $x$, isn't it required that probability be strictly less than 0.5 -- the opposite of what you say? I'm not sure why the question of whether probability equals 0.5 has any bearing anyway. It would matter if one of the cumulative probabilities happened to equal 0.5, but this doesn't occur either in the original poster's problem or in my example problem.
Aug
5
comment Probability and Statistics Binomials distribution
@BenedictVoltaire: (1) Where does 0.05 come from? (2) Can you say what it is in my answer you object to?
Aug
4
revised Block of integers: Divisibility
added 25 characters in body
Aug
4
comment Complex number identity by trigonometry
Using the midpoint of the line joining $1$ to $e^{i\theta}$ would make this completely straightforward.
Jul
29
revised Block of integers: Divisibility
added 18 characters in body
Jul
27
comment Why does $n \choose r$ where $r = 1,n$ track $2^n$?
In your array application, consider marking each array element with a 0 for "not taken" or a 1 for "taken". There are two choices for each array element and therefore $2^n$ ways to mark the entire array.