3,599 reputation
1037
bio website bu.edu/sed/about-us/faculty/…
location Boston University, SED
age 28
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen 15 hours ago

Profile for Benjamin Dickman on Stack Exchange: MESE, MSE, and MO

Postdoctoral Fellow, Mathematics Education, Boston University SED.

Ph.D., Mathematics Education, Columbia University. 2014. NSFGRFP.

Dissertation: Conceptions of Creativity in Elementary School Mathematical Problem Posing. (Relevant MESE post here.)

M.Phil., Mathematics Education, Columbia University. 2014.

Fulbright Grant, Mathematics/Mathematics Education, Nanjing Normal University (南京师范大学). 2008-2009.

Research Topic: High School Mathematics Teacher Training in China.

B.A., Mathematics, Amherst College. 2008. Honors Program.

Undergraduate Thesis: On a Theorem of Dwork. (p-adic proof of the rationality part of the Weil Conjectures; relevant MSE post here.)


Have you solved any of my puzzles? If so, send me an email!
Email: bdickman[at]bu。edu


15h
comment An alternating series identity with a hidden hyperbolic tangent
Thanks! Yes, an approach using theta functions is found at the MO post linked in the OP; in particular, see this answer.
2d
revised An alternating series identity with a hidden hyperbolic tangent
Indicated clearly that I am looking for a solution using the inv. Mellin transf.
Jan
25
comment closed form for a double sum
See also: mathoverflow.net/q/189199/22971
Jan
24
comment An alternating series identity with a hidden hyperbolic tangent
This is great! I may bounty just to see if someone can explain how to solve the problem using an inverse Mellin transform, but this should still be marked the correct answer.
Jan
23
revised An alternating series identity with a hidden hyperbolic tangent
Included some computations using (inverse) Mellin transformation
Jan
23
comment An alternating series identity with a hidden hyperbolic tangent
@MhenniBenghorbal Could you add more details? The scenario here is somewhat different from your linked example insofar as the inverse Mellin transform includes the generalized Riemann zeta function (which has tangled me up in finding poles/computing residues).
Jan
23
revised An alternating series identity with a hidden hyperbolic tangent
Added the integral-transforms tag in case the suggested approach with an inverse Mellin transform can work here.
Jan
23
comment An alternating series identity with a hidden hyperbolic tangent
@CAFosta The series certainly converges: Use the Alternating series test. In particular, the series converges to the right-hand side, i.e., $\frac{1}{8}(\pi - 5\log(2))$. My question is how to prove this identity holds (ideally without appealing to the two links in the body of my post!).
Jan
23
asked An alternating series identity with a hidden hyperbolic tangent
Jan
19
comment What's your favorite proof accessible to a general audience?
@userX Yes, I have given this talk to pre-service and in-service secondary school teachers (who were graduate students at Teachers College Columbia University). I gave it as a "model" lecture for students attending a teaching seminar; I think it went pretty well, since the attendees looked to be quite engaged (and I was invited back to give another talk the next year - that one ended up being about the multiplication table).
Jan
19
answered What's your favorite proof accessible to a general audience?
Dec
20
awarded  Constituent
Dec
9
awarded  Caucus
Dec
4
revised Prove that $1 + 4 + 7 + · · · + 3n − 2 = \frac {n(3n − 1)}{2}$
Corrected an erroneous 2 to a 4; also replaced ... with ldots
Nov
14
revised Possible values of $\gcd(a+b, a\times b)$
Cleaned up presentation now that an answer has been given.
Nov
13
comment Possible values of $\gcd(a+b, a\times b)$
This is great; thanks!
Nov
13
accepted Possible values of $\gcd(a+b, a\times b)$
Nov
13
revised Possible values of $\gcd(a+b, a\times b)$
Corrected after answer!
Nov
13
revised Possible values of $\gcd(a+b, a\times b)$
rolled back to a previous revision
Nov
13
revised Possible values of $\gcd(a+b, a\times b)$
Conjecture 1 removed thanks to D. Fischer; too unwieldy too leave up as a vestige.