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visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Oct 16 at 6:18

Jul
23
comment What are some conceptualizations that work in mathematics but are not strictly true?
@Semiclassical Can you clarify the mathematical objections that would raise? I'm curious to know.
Mar
19
comment Non-invertible operators
Certainly - both questions could be answered in a purely mathematical context.
Mar
4
awarded  Commentator
Mar
4
comment Examples of mathematical results discovered “late”
I'm likely off, but isn't the posted problem quickly solved by use of coordinate geometry?
Apr
1
comment Best Fake Proofs? (A M.SE April Fools Day collection)
I'm going there this summer myself. I'm part of the "new generation," I see.
Mar
25
revised Maximum Value of Multiple Uniformly Distributed Variables
Clarified question
Mar
25
asked Maximum Value of Multiple Uniformly Distributed Variables
Mar
1
awarded  Critic
Mar
1
comment Calculate the angle between two vectors
Thanks. Editing...
Mar
1
comment Calculate the angle between two vectors
What you did used the dot product, which is usually the standard way to find angles. However, because of your requirement for angles to be oriented, the dot product will not work. I'll elaborate a bit more in my answer where I can more freely LaTeX.
Mar
1
answered Calculate the angle between two vectors
Feb
21
accepted Why $\int_{-1}^1 \frac{1}{x^3}\, \mathrm{d} x \neq 0$?
Feb
21
comment Why $\int_{-1}^1 \frac{1}{x^3}\, \mathrm{d} x \neq 0$?
So am I right in saying that the Cauchy Principal Value does not equal the value of the integral because in calculating the Cauchy Principal Value, one of the two integrals must still contain the x-value of 0? Furthermore, how would someone go about calculating the true value of the integral rather than simply its Cauchy Principal Value? While I realize the conceptual difference between one limit and two limits, I fail to see how the solution will differ between these two cases.
Feb
21
revised Why $\int_{-1}^1 \frac{1}{x^3}\, \mathrm{d} x \neq 0$?
Fixed limit
Feb
21
asked Why $\int_{-1}^1 \frac{1}{x^3}\, \mathrm{d} x \neq 0$?
Feb
18
comment Let $f$ and $g$ be differentiable functions with the following properties:
Oh, dear. I should have read the question more carefully.
Feb
18
answered Let $f$ and $g$ be differentiable functions with the following properties:
Jan
3
comment $\tan(x) = x$. Find the values of $x$
When you did it graphically, you may not have set your calculator window to be large enough.
Dec
20
awarded  Scholar
Dec
20
awarded  Supporter