317 reputation
17
bio website izbicki.me
location Riverside, CA
age
visits member for 1 year, 8 months
seen 14 hours ago

I'm a phd student at UC Riverside.


Apr
4
awarded  Tumbleweed
Mar
28
revised generalizing taylor expansions to incorporate arbitrary constraints
added 11 characters in body
Mar
28
asked generalizing taylor expansions to incorporate arbitrary constraints
Dec
17
comment Taking the (pseudo)inverse of a monoid operation.
@Berci I don't think this can be a Hopf monoid. Using rationals under addition as the operation, I'll take the pseuodinverse $g(x)=(x/2,x/2)$ as above. But $(g(x),x) \ne (x,g(x))$ so the coassociativity law doesn't hold. Of course, I might be misunderstanding something.
Dec
16
comment Taking the (pseudo)inverse of a monoid operation.
$g(x)=(x/2,x/2); g(x/2)=(x/4,x/4); g(x/4) = (x/8,x/8)$ and so on. I just mean that we can apply $g$ to its left output, right output, or both outputs.
Dec
16
revised Taking the (pseudo)inverse of a monoid operation.
brought question to top of post
Dec
16
asked Taking the (pseudo)inverse of a monoid operation.
Sep
20
asked How to solve this nonlinear matrix equation
Aug
24
accepted What's the dual of a binary operation?
Aug
23
accepted What do you call a monoid generated from a semigroup?
Aug
23
asked What's the dual of a binary operation?
Jul
31
awarded  Yearling
Jun
12
awarded  Teacher
Jun
12
answered Does this object have a category-theoretic name?
Jan
26
comment Morphisms generated by functions
@FredrikMeyer That's what inspired the question! Maybe I'm an idiot, but I don't see any functions of the form $g$ has on that page.
Jan
26
asked Morphisms generated by functions
Dec
31
comment What do you call this generalization of a module?
Thank you. I remember that $(-1)(m+n) = (-1)n+(-1)m$, but I forget the proof. Could you remind me?
Dec
31
accepted What do you call this generalization of a module?
Dec
30
asked What do you call this generalization of a module?
Dec
18
comment Does this object have a category-theoretic name?
@Adeel Thanks. I'm calling it the factordomain, and that seems pretty reasonable.