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Jul
23
asked Are there any resources on this notion of a “directed” semigroup?
Jul
1
comment Is there a special name for functors from a category C to a subcategory of C?
I've updated the question. I'm interested in the case where $\hom(S)$ is a strict subset of $\hom(C)$.
Jul
1
revised Is there a special name for functors from a category C to a subcategory of C?
added 132 characters in body
Jul
1
comment Is there a special name for functors from a category C to a subcategory of C?
True, but endofunctors map a category back onto itself. I was wondering if there's a term for something strictly more specific.
Jul
1
asked Is there a special name for functors from a category C to a subcategory of C?
Mar
7
comment What do these definitions of conjugacy have in common?
Do you know anything about the historical development of these names? My guess would be that complex conjugates came first, then the idea of conjugates in a field and group conjugates were created about the same time with the development of galois theory.
Mar
7
comment What do these definitions of conjugacy have in common?
This is a nice connection between types 1 and 2, but it doesn't really answer the question since it doesn't address the other types of conjugacy.
Mar
6
comment What do these definitions of conjugacy have in common?
@littleO That's also typically true of things called "dual".
Mar
6
comment What do these definitions of conjugacy have in common?
@YuvalFilmus Maybe this is a better way to phrase the question: When the mathematicians who invented each of those definitions named their idea, why did they choose the word "conjugate" as opposed to some other word? Maybe there's a historical or linguistic context?
Mar
6
asked What do these definitions of conjugacy have in common?
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Apr
30
accepted categorification and linear algebra
Apr
22
asked categorification and linear algebra
Apr
4
awarded  Tumbleweed
Dec
17
comment Taking the (pseudo)inverse of a monoid operation.
@Berci I don't think this can be a Hopf monoid. Using rationals under addition as the operation, I'll take the pseuodinverse $g(x)=(x/2,x/2)$ as above. But $(g(x),x) \ne (x,g(x))$ so the coassociativity law doesn't hold. Of course, I might be misunderstanding something.
Dec
16
comment Taking the (pseudo)inverse of a monoid operation.
$g(x)=(x/2,x/2); g(x/2)=(x/4,x/4); g(x/4) = (x/8,x/8)$ and so on. I just mean that we can apply $g$ to its left output, right output, or both outputs.
Dec
16
revised Taking the (pseudo)inverse of a monoid operation.
brought question to top of post
Dec
16
asked Taking the (pseudo)inverse of a monoid operation.
Sep
20
asked How to solve this nonlinear matrix equation