163 reputation
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age 28
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen May 18 at 22:09

I have a question.


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Aug
17
accepted Set theory homework
Aug
17
comment Set theory homework
Then X must be equal to Y, is that right? Because since $Y = A\cup B$ and $Y\supset X$, there's no possibility of an $X\neq A\cup B$. I think this proof is too circular. Isn't it? Does it suffice?
Aug
17
comment Set theory homework
$X \supset A$ means X is just a superset of A, not a proper one.
Aug
17
asked Set theory homework
Apr
23
comment Proof involving division algorithm
Thanks, I'm studying it.
Apr
23
revised Proof involving division algorithm
Added 'homework' tag
Apr
23
asked Proof involving division algorithm
Apr
14
awarded  Commentator
Apr
14
comment Using Bézout's Identity to prove that given $\gcd$ of two numbers is really true
I'm still struggling to fully understand it, but I think you've answered my question, so I accepted your answer. Thanks a lot.
Apr
14
accepted Using Bézout's Identity to prove that given $\gcd$ of two numbers is really true
Apr
13
comment Using Bézout's Identity to prove that given $\gcd$ of two numbers is really true
Three days and several pages later, I can say I don't understand it. For example, why do you start the proof with a multiple of $(n!+1)$? And, more importantly, I don't understand what seems to be the main argument: "if d divides n!+1 and n, it divides 1." Why?
Apr
10
comment Using Bézout's Identity to prove that given $\gcd$ of two numbers is really true
@p and @andre-nicolas, what you did is really helping. I'm almost understanding it. I would keep trying today, but I must sleep. I'm taking notes of both your results to think more about it in the morning, after class, since I'll have access to internet only tomorrow afternoon. Thanks.
Apr
10
revised Using Bézout's Identity to prove that given $\gcd$ of two numbers is really true
What I meant by "Bézout's Theorem" was in fact "Bézout's Identity", sorry.
Apr
10
asked Using Bézout's Identity to prove that given $\gcd$ of two numbers is really true
Apr
4
accepted Representing positions on a grid as a base-3 number
Apr
4
comment Representing positions on a grid as a base-3 number
Ok, I guess I understand what makes base-3 numbers so convenient. Correct me if I'm wrong. I could very well read the numbers on the grid as base-10 numbers. But then, there would be "jumps" as I count upwards. All the possible positions of the numbers would still make 19683 possibilities, but in base-10, I wouldn't be able to count sequentially from 0 to 222,222,222. I would have to "jump" all the numbers that have the digits 3-9. Base-3 is convenient because I can increment one by one and list all the combinations. Is that right?
Apr
4
awarded  Supporter
Apr
4
asked Representing positions on a grid as a base-3 number