5,193 reputation
1529
bio website
location France
age 37
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen 2 hours ago

I'm an undercover :) computer science teacher


Dec
8
awarded  Caucus
Dec
2
comment A graph with diameter $2$
You're welcome. Note that you can prove from this example that $M\approx\sqrt[D]{n}$.
Dec
2
answered A graph with diameter $2$
Nov
25
answered How can I prove the last two digits of $1+2^{2^{n}}+3^{2^n}+4^{2^n}$ always are $54$
Nov
21
comment Where did I go wrong in this integration $\int\frac{\ln(1-e^x)}{e^{2x}}\,dx$
because when you integrate $\frac{1}{x}$, you obtain $\ln(|x|)$. So $|e^{-x}-1|=|1-e^{-x}|$.
Nov
21
answered Where did I go wrong in this integration $\int\frac{\ln(1-e^x)}{e^{2x}}\,dx$
Nov
14
comment Minkowski's question mark function iterations
@Daniel But do you have any idea of what it maps to quadratic algebraic numbers bijectively ?
Nov
4
revised Are well-orders of the same recursive length recursively isomorphic?
edited body
Nov
4
answered Are well-orders of the same recursive length recursively isomorphic?
Oct
25
comment Kleene normal form : elementary?
@ChristianRemling Yes, I understand, but why being so vague as "primitive recursive" when you can be more accurate ?
Oct
25
asked Kleene normal form : elementary?
Oct
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
18
comment Does $1.0000000000\cdots 1$ with an infinite number of $0$ in it exist?
@AsafKaragila I do agree with you !
Oct
18
comment Does $1.0000000000\cdots 1$ with an infinite number of $0$ in it exist?
@AsafKaragila It's not horrendous to say that $\lim_{n\in\mathbb N\rightarrow\infty}n=\omega$...
Oct
18
comment Does $1.0000000000\cdots 1$ with an infinite number of $0$ in it exist?
@AsafKaragila Sorry I was talking about the initial sequence of the OP, that is $1+\frac{1}{10^n}$.
Oct
18
comment Does $1.0000000000\cdots 1$ with an infinite number of $0$ in it exist?
@AsafKaragila When you talk about limit, you talk about topology. So it depends of your topology. Of course, on reals, the limit is 1, and there is no limit on surreals (except for constant sequences). So yes, this is not the limit !! :)
Oct
18
comment Does $1.0000000000\cdots 1$ with an infinite number of $0$ in it exist?
@user1485853. Yes, surreals are an extension (with ordinals) of reals.
Oct
18
comment Does $1.0000000000\cdots 1$ with an infinite number of $0$ in it exist?
I use $2^{-\omega}$ as a shorthand for the $\omega^{th}$ digit. This is not defined from the exponential function, even if it coincides for the finite positions...
Oct
18
comment Does $1.0000000000\cdots 1$ with an infinite number of $0$ in it exist?
@HansLundmark That's a good point. You can see usual expansion as a binary one, and use the usual modulo algorithm to get the decimal one, using the fact that $2^{-\omega}=10^{-\omega}=\frac{1}{\omega}$... But I admit this must be defined more accurately !
Oct
18
answered Does $1.0000000000\cdots 1$ with an infinite number of $0$ in it exist?