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2d
comment Mathematician vs. Computer: A Game
@martin Range: 13, best n: {12}, probability for win: 0.121212 The last number makes no sense in the context.
2d
comment Mathematician vs. Computer: A Game
@martin That response doesn't make any sense either.
2d
comment Mathematician vs. Computer: A Game
None of the probability values listed in this answer make any sense, but I haven't found any flaws in your listings of optimal numbers.
Aug
31
revised How do I Solve This Kind of Differential Equation?
Added a brief description of each step.
Aug
31
suggested suggested edit on How do I Solve This Kind of Differential Equation?
Aug
31
comment How do I Solve This Kind of Differential Equation?
That is a transformation.
Aug
31
comment How do I Solve This Kind of Differential Equation?
What kind of transformations did you use? Perhaps with links to relevant articles. The only one that doesn't look totally arbitrary to me is the final transformation.
Aug
31
comment How do I Solve This Kind of Differential Equation?
-1 There is no explanation, this will not help anyone who doesn't know how to do this already.
Aug
16
awarded  Scholar
Aug
16
accepted Deterministic random numbers generator using $p^n \mod q$
Aug
16
answered Deterministic random numbers generator using $p^n \mod q$
May
18
comment Nuking the Mosquito — ridiculously complicated ways to achieve very simple results
Sorry, but now it is 5 equations with 6 unknowns, still not good enough, and there is a typo in the second. If you fix the second to AB*BC=0 and add in BC*DC=0 it should work.
May
18
comment Nuking the Mosquito — ridiculously complicated ways to achieve very simple results
The official solution as written here can't be correct, it has 6 unknowns but only 4 equations. Obviously we also need some equations with AD, and we need to include CD to make any useful equations with AD. So add in AB+BC+CD+DA=0, |BC|=|AD| and |AB|=|CD|. That will give a solveable equation set of 9 equations with 9 unknowns. And anyone who isn't a mathochist is crying in a corner by now.
Apr
21
answered Non-literal applications of “Shortest Path” algorithm?
Mar
1
answered Why is not the answer to all probability questions 1/2.
Jan
31
comment Coin flipping probability game ; 7 flips vs 8 flips
Note that you have a problem with a trivial finite number of equally distributed outcomes, 32768 of them to be exact. In such a case you can iterate over each one of them and count the outcomes to calculate the exact probabilities. Unlike a Monte Carlo simulation it is a valid proof for the specific conditions. Though there is no formal way to extend it to a class of problems, and it doesn't provide much understanding, so a traditional proof is usually preferable.
Jan
14
comment Why does this not seem to be random?
Yes, and you wrote the opposite in the second to last paragraph.
Jan
14
comment Why does this not seem to be random?
I think you are missing a "not": "then the expected number of distinct numbers [not] chosen is"
Dec
28
comment How is the value of $\pi$ ( Pi ) actually calculated?
The answer you have marked as accepted is not a method for deriving $\pi$ since the formula depend on the value of $\pi$. I urge you to unmark it.
Dec
28
comment How is the value of $\pi$ ( Pi ) actually calculated?
-1 Your method use the degree $\sin$ function, which works by multiplying the input by $\pi/180$ before using a $\sin$ algorithm. Basically it is just a complicated way of extracting the built-in $\pi$ constant in your calculator or programming language. Archimedes did not use trigonometric functions, he used basic geometry. Since you can't delete an accepted answer I'd urge you to blank it until it is un-accepted.