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May
1
comment Which mathematical topics should an applied math major know to be employable in industry?
Probability and statistics is certainly a must — even if it is not specifically needed for your job. If nothing else, it will allow you not to fall for the all to common lies "supported" with appropriately presented statistics.
May
1
comment Compute $\lim_\limits{n\to\infty}a_n$ where $a_{n+2}=\sqrt{a_n.a_{n+1}}$
You got the exponent of the limit wrong. But since the derivation is correct and great, +1 anyway.
May
1
answered Compute $\lim_\limits{n\to\infty}a_n$ where $a_{n+2}=\sqrt{a_n.a_{n+1}}$
May
1
answered $5x\equiv3\pmod3$
Apr
30
comment If there are injective homomorphisms between two groups in both directions, are they isomorphic?
What about ordered fields?
Apr
30
comment Confused with imaginary numbers
Of course $-1=1$ because $-1 = \sqrt{-1}^2 = \sqrt{(-1)^2} = \sqrt{1} = 1$. Thus $-\mathrm i = -1\mathrm i = 1\mathrm i = \mathrm i$. :-)
Apr
30
comment What does $(m, n) = 1$ mean?
I actually think the parenthesis notation is overloaded too much. $(a,b)$ may be a pair, an interval, a gcd … anything else?
Apr
30
answered Zeroes of sin(x)
Apr
30
accepted What questions are independent from the axiom of constructibility?
Apr
28
answered Point in four dimensions
Apr
28
answered True or false: sets, subsets, and topologies in $\mathbb R$
Apr
28
revised Tangent of Circles
A meaningful alt tag for the image
Apr
28
comment What questions are independent from the axiom of constructibility?
What does Con(ZFC) mean?
Apr
28
asked What questions are independent from the axiom of constructibility?
Apr
26
awarded  Sportsmanship
Apr
26
comment $b^{\frac{m}{n}}=(b^{\frac{1}{n}})^m=(b^m)^{\frac{1}{n}}$ except $b$ is not negative when $n$ is Even.
@SufyanNaeem: I notice that you also edited the quote. That means either the original quote or the current quote is not correct (because there's only one thing that's in the book). In particular, your edit changed the meaning of the quote.
Apr
26
answered Proving $AD_1A^{-1}=D_2$
Apr
26
comment What is the function that generates this graph?
Your function would give e.g. $(4,0)$ instead of $(4,1)$ and $(7,3)$ instead of $(7,7)$.
Apr
26
comment Proving $AD_1A^{-1}=D_2$
Hint: Applying $A$ from the left gives permutation of the rows. Applying $A^T$ from the right gives permutation of the columns. The diagonal consists of all matrix elements where the row index equals the column index.
Apr
26
comment Up to isomorphism
@yons: Yes. Basically it says the labels are effectively just that, names for the group elements; to use a non-group example, up to relabelling isomorphism, the sets $\{1,2,3,\ldots\}$ $\{\text{one}, \text{two}, \text{three}, \ldots\}$ and $\{|,||,|||,\ldots\}$ are the same if the arithmetic structure is defined appropriately.