2,648 reputation
2033
bio website ephorie.de
location Germany
age 44
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen Oct 14 at 20:03

just an amateur fascinated by math


Jan
25
accepted How to ensure that you haven't run into a paradox proving a theorem e.g. by proof by contradiction?
Jan
24
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Why Q is not locally compact, connected, or path connected?
Jan
24
comment How to ensure that you haven't run into a paradox proving a theorem e.g. by proof by contradiction?
Thank you, looks promising!
Jan
24
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Classifying singularity
Jan
24
comment How to ensure that you haven't run into a paradox proving a theorem e.g. by proof by contradiction?
@TimSeguine: But there still remains the possibility that when you assume the negation and again arrive at a contradiction that your axiom system is faulty (see Zermelo-Russell paradox), so the question remains: How to ensure that you haven't run into a paradox proving a theorem?
Jan
24
asked How to ensure that you haven't run into a paradox proving a theorem e.g. by proof by contradiction?
Jan
8
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Prove that $\lim_{n\to\infty}\left[1-\prod_{i=1}^{n} (1-\frac{a}{i} )\right]= 1$.
Dec
30
awarded  Custodian
Dec
30
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Systems of linear equations to calculate $\alpha$ and $\beta$
Dec
1
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
25
comment How to see and proof that the hyperbola as a constant difference of distances holds for $\frac{1}{x}$?
@AlexR: I edited the question - is it clearer now?
Nov
25
revised How to see and proof that the hyperbola as a constant difference of distances holds for $\frac{1}{x}$?
added 155 characters in body
Nov
25
comment How to see and proof that the hyperbola as a constant difference of distances holds for $\frac{1}{x}$?
@AlexR: I am afraid I still don't understand: What part doesn't make sense gramatically?!?
Nov
25
comment How to see and proof that the hyperbola as a constant difference of distances holds for $\frac{1}{x}$?
@AlexR: What exactly is unclear to you? The first part gives a definition of the hyperbola (see also link to wikipedia which is included), the second part asks the question how to prove that this def. holds for 1/x.
Nov
25
asked How to see and proof that the hyperbola as a constant difference of distances holds for $\frac{1}{x}$?
Nov
11
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
5
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
1
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
30
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
8
comment How to estimate the size of a ratio with very large factorials?
@StevenStadnicki: You are right, I made a stupid beginner's mistake :-( I wanted to estimate $\frac{10^{18}!}{10^{14}!\ (10^{18}-10^{14})!}$