2,579 reputation
1933
bio website ephorie.de
location Germany
age 44
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Jul 20 at 15:43

just an amateur fascinated by math


Jan
24
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Classifying singularity
Jan
24
comment How to ensure that you haven't run into a paradox proving a theorem e.g. by proof by contradiction?
@TimSeguine: But there still remains the possibility that when you assume the negation and again arrive at a contradiction that your axiom system is faulty (see Zermelo-Russell paradox), so the question remains: How to ensure that you haven't run into a paradox proving a theorem?
Jan
24
asked How to ensure that you haven't run into a paradox proving a theorem e.g. by proof by contradiction?
Jan
24
comment How to ensure that you haven't run into a paradox proving a theorem e.g. by proof by contradiction?
@NateEldredge: I understand that. But of what value is this proof when you find out that your underlying axiomatic system is faulty! In the above mentioned example shouldn't you at least also try to proof that $\sqrt2$ is irrational. When you arrive at another contradiction shouldn't this be worrying although both are valid proofs? So I think my question is also still valid: How to ensure that you haven't run into a paradox proving a theorem?
Jan
24
comment How to ensure that you haven't run into a paradox proving a theorem e.g. by proof by contradiction?
@StevenLandsburg: Thank you for the helpful comment. I modified the quesion accordingly - hope this helps.
Jan
24
asked How to ensure that you haven't run into a paradox proving a theorem e.g. by proof by contradiction?
Jan
8
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Prove that $\lim_{n\to\infty}\left[1-\prod_{i=1}^{n} (1-\frac{a}{i} )\right]= 1$.
Dec
30
awarded  Custodian
Dec
30
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Systems of linear equations to calculate $\alpha$ and $\beta$
Dec
1
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
25
comment How to see and proof that the hyperbola as a constant difference of distances holds for $\frac{1}{x}$?
@AlexR: I edited the question - is it clearer now?
Nov
25
revised How to see and proof that the hyperbola as a constant difference of distances holds for $\frac{1}{x}$?
added 155 characters in body
Nov
25
comment How to see and proof that the hyperbola as a constant difference of distances holds for $\frac{1}{x}$?
@AlexR: I am afraid I still don't understand: What part doesn't make sense gramatically?!?
Nov
25
comment How to see and proof that the hyperbola as a constant difference of distances holds for $\frac{1}{x}$?
@AlexR: What exactly is unclear to you? The first part gives a definition of the hyperbola (see also link to wikipedia which is included), the second part asks the question how to prove that this def. holds for 1/x.
Nov
25
asked How to see and proof that the hyperbola as a constant difference of distances holds for $\frac{1}{x}$?
Nov
11
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
5
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
1
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
30
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
8
comment How to estimate the size of a ratio with very large factorials?
@StevenStadnicki: You are right, I made a stupid beginner's mistake :-( I wanted to estimate $\frac{10^{18}!}{10^{14}!\ (10^{18}-10^{14})!}$