356 reputation
113
bio website plus.google.com/u/0/…
location London, United Kingdom
age
visits member for 2 years, 1 month
seen Jul 7 at 13:46

I'm an applied mathematician & engineer, living & working just outside the London metro area.

Over the years and on both sides of the Atlantic, I've led a variety of quantitative & operational challenges across intelligent systems & software engineering, sonar, defense, environmental technology, robotics, and most recently the complex world of multi-channel retail.

The common thread that links passion, profession, and play is applying technology, good design, and quantitative modelling and simulation, to build better products, enable better decisions, and optimise performance.

I'm always experimenting and tinkering, so feel free to get in touch with ideas.

My Google+ profile, Google+ posts (active), and blog (older)


Jul
7
revised Keep getting generating function wrong (making change for a dollar)
Added the actual problem into title so it surfaces when searching for making change.
Jul
7
suggested suggested edit on Keep getting generating function wrong (making change for a dollar)
Jul
7
comment Making Change for a Dollar (and other number partitioning problems)
Worth noting that the list of available denominations in this version includes the non-change making option of $1.00. The solution is of course 292 for the usual version with strictly smaller denominations up to 50c (George Polya in How To Solve It, 1971).
Jul
7
comment Making Change for a Dollar (and other number partitioning problems)
(+1) Very interesting references.
Jul
3
revised How do I read this question? (subject: bijections)
OP had acknowledge AKE. AKE's handle has changed to Assad Ebrahim. Updated the reference.
Jul
3
suggested suggested edit on How do I read this question? (subject: bijections)
Jun
30
comment What is mathematical basis for the percent symbol (%)?
@Rahul: It's a good mnemonic nonetheless...
Jun
23
revised Poisson Distribution and Median
Add reference for R since this is a Maths site and perhaps the reader is not familiar with the tool
Jun
23
answered Poisson Distribution and Median
May
19
comment The definition of independence is not intuitive
@StevenTaschuk: the common concept between technical and non-technical uses of 'independent' is "not influenced from outside". In common use, independent scientists are not influenced by other teams. In probability, independent events are not influenced by knowing the outcome of one of them. The emphasis is on influence, not on disjointedness.
May
19
suggested suggested edit on The definition of independence is not intuitive
May
19
comment Intuition behind independence & conditional probability
I think you've got a great "motivated" answer by @IttayWeiss. He presents a plausible story of how one might have proceeded and arrived at the current definitions. Are you satisfied with his answer or are you still looking for a better one?
May
19
revised Intuition behind independence & conditional probability
Elaborated the title to include conditional probability; added tags
May
19
suggested suggested edit on Intuition behind independence & conditional probability
May
19
comment Intuition behind independence & conditional probability
+1 -- this is a "motivated" definition, in the sense of the OP's question, i.e. it presents a plausible story of how one might have proceeded and arrived at the current definitions. Very nice!
May
19
comment Conditional probability of the intersection of independent events
I've not seen $\perp$ used before in this context, but I like it. Am assuming it denotes independence, is that right? Do you know of any probability references that use it?
Apr
23
revised How do I read this question? (subject: bijections)
Added subject into title.
Apr
23
suggested suggested edit on How do I read this question? (subject: bijections)
Apr
23
revised What does this $\asymp$ symbol mean? (subject: analytic number theory)
Added the symbol into the title.
Apr
22
comment What does this $\asymp$ symbol mean? (subject: analytic number theory)
(+1)... in English: "there exist positive constants C,D such that $f$ can be sandwiched between $g$ scaled appropriately above and below."