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location Atlanta (GA)
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visits member for 1 year, 10 months
seen Jan 27 at 22:09

I am a PhD student in applied math, working in the field of numerical analysis for partial differential equations. The library I'm (humbly) trying to help to develop is written in c++, using mpi for the parallelism issues. My background other than c++ is pretty low, so I can't say that I KNOW any programming language other than that (although I have coded something back in the days in Python and SQL, but it was too little and too 'scholastic' to claim I know it...also, I forgot most of it).

In math I have a somewhat deep knowledge in analysis, matrix analysis, numerical analysis, partial differential equations, Navier-Stokes equations and optimization. But I can't say I'm an expert in any of the above fields...although, I try my best. =)


Jan
23
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
2
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
2
awarded  Critic
Jul
6
comment Examples of truly abstract evolution PDEs?
For NS equations H is still $L^2$ though. I haven't read that book, but I think the fact that you can prove that the solution lies also in some other crazy $L^p$ space is a consequence of the settings $V=H^1$ and $H=L^2$.
Jun
17
awarded  Yearling
May
24
answered Understanding weighted inner product and weighted norms
May
21
comment Must a complex power series *fail* to be convergent somewhere on its circle of convergence?
I was thinking to the same one. This is absolutely convergent for |x|=1, hence it must be convergent.
May
21
comment How to calculate an orthonormal basis for a matrix?
Do the column of the matrix need to be orthogonal as well or are you just looking for an orthonormal basis such that, expressed in that basis, the columns of the matrix have length one?
Dec
3
comment Good introductory book on fluid dynamics
Marvis, I believe that a course/reading on NS equations, which is a really applied math topic, should be followed/integrated by a topic on CFD. You learn a lot on NS equations by looking at the challenges and difficulties of its discretization schemes.
Dec
3
answered What do I need to know to simulate many particles, waves, or fluids?
Nov
16
comment Eigenvector Bases
Yes, REAL skew symmetric matrices have zeros on the diagonal. That's because $a_{ii} = -a_{ii}$
Oct
29
comment Show that its a Generalized Eigenvalue problem
Can you provide some more detail? What is $K$? And what is $L$? Is $\gamma$ positive? Is $f$ real valued?
Oct
29
revised Proving/disproving an identity on a Hessian.
I was missing a square
Oct
29
answered A question involving Poincaré inequality
Oct
29
answered Proving/disproving an identity on a Hessian.
Oct
29
comment A question involving Poincaré inequality
Well, as you wrote it this statement is actually false, unless you can assume something about $u$. Usually the extra assumption is that that $u$ vanishes on $\partial \Omega$. Another possible assumption is that $u$ has zero average on $\Omega$.
Oct
25
answered The subset of $C^{\infty}$ functions with compact support in $\mathbb{R}$ in the space of bounded real valued continuos function on $\mathbb{R}$
Oct
12
answered How to find the eigenvalues and eigenvector without computation?
Oct
1
comment Smoothness of a non-local functional
Scratch what I said. It was orthogonal to your point. =) You might be right, it could be big-O. Which is actually enough for what we need to prove. Anyway, if the modulus of continuity is o(h), I think you only get to say that the function is sublinear. Not sure though...I should think about it.
Oct
1
comment Smoothness of a non-local functional
When it would be big-O of 2nd order terms, which means little-O of 1st order terms. Just like for functions of real variables. The differential is the linear part of the incremental quotient (as the norm of the increment goes to zero), so whatever is left has to be a little-O of the norm of the increment.