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Jan
5
comment Please explain $4z + 2 = 2z + 1$
Exactly where is your problem? Any equality, such as $4z+2=2z+1$, says that two things or expressions are equal. When you do the same operation on both sides of the equality sign, the results will be equal to each other. By choosing the operations wisely, you end up with an equality saying that $z$ is equal to some number.
Dec
19
revised How to compute this integral
Edited tags
Dec
19
revised How to compute the Laurent series
Edited tags
Dec
14
answered complex series expansion for $f(z)=\frac{1}{z-1}$
Nov
24
revised Matrix equation: solving $AB(A^{-1})(D^T)(C-1 )= E$ for $D$
Corrected tags.
Nov
24
revised Calculating $\sum_{n=1}^\infty {\frac{nx^n}{4n^2-1}}$
rolled back to a previous revision
Nov
20
comment Moscow State Oral Exam
In order to get feedback, you should pose this as a new question, and not as an answer to another question.
Nov
20
answered How to deal with misapplying mathematical rules?
Nov
15
comment How to see symbol manipulation from an intuitive perspective in math?
The link goes to a page where one can buy access to the text. It would be better if you gave the example directly, instead of this link.
Nov
15
comment Why isn't the derivative of $|2x^2-3x|$ equal to $|4x-3|$?
Look at a simpler example. Why isn't the derivative of $|x|$ equal to $|1|$?
Nov
12
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
6
answered Question about Weierstrass approximation theorem
Sep
26
answered How do I differentiate $ ({\log n})^{\log n}$?
Sep
20
comment A simple(ish) proof for the lagrangian with one inequality constraint?
You should add these conditions to the statement of the theorem. For the proof, you can divide into two cases, according to whether $g(a,b)=m$, or $g(a,b)<m$.
Sep
18
answered Kuhn Tucker conditions, and the sign of the Lagrangian multiplier
Sep
7
comment a problem with the induction hypothesis
The inductive step is to show that whenever $p(n)$ is true, then $p(n+1)$ will also be true.
Aug
31
comment Encyclopedia of Mathematics?(non-Alphabetical)
This reminded me of a footnote by Sokal in his hoax article in Social Text (1996): "For a gentle introduction to set theory, see Bourbaki (1970)."
Jul
15
comment Calculating the $k$th digit of $\pi$
The formula will also provide binary digits just as easily (since 4 binary digits = 1 hexadecimal digit).
Jun
12
awarded  Yearling