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 Yearling
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Jul
15
comment Calculating the $k$th digit of $\pi$
The formula will also provide binary digits just as easily (since 4 binary digits = 1 hexadecimal digit).
Jun
12
awarded  Yearling
Jun
3
comment Suppose $T$ is a linear operator $(V,V)$, and $T^2=T$. Does this means it is the identity operator?
Operators with this property are in fact called projection operators.
May
24
answered How to evaluate the determinant
May
18
answered Can we still learn from the old masters?
Feb
27
answered Necessary condition for positive-semidefiniteness — is it sufficient?
Jan
29
answered Books / Articles on how mathematical education has changed over time
Jan
26
revised mixed limit of ·$ x^{-y} $ whenever x tends to $ \infty $ and $y \to 0^{+} $
Removed unrelated tag
Jan
26
revised How to define percentage values in terms of scalar values
Removed unrelated tag
Jan
24
comment length plus width equals price, factoring?
You are using the same faktor $F$ in both cases. If $F$ is a constant then $P$ will be proportional to the perimeter of the rectangle.
Jan
24
comment Algebra on a Louvre tablet
Geometric algebra would have been a correct tag (but not the tag geometric algebras, which dels with Clifford algebras!). The equation (2) above is essentially Euclid II.8.
Jan
19
answered Value of $\pi$ by Aryabhata
Jan
13
answered geometry developments during the Islamic Golden Age (7-13 century)
Dec
21
awarded  Constituent
Dec
9
awarded  Caucus
Dec
5
comment Does anyone know about Ramanujan's method of solving the quartic?
The MacTutor History of Mathematics says that "Ramanujan was shown how to solve cubic equations in 1902 and he went on to find his own method to solve the quartic."
Nov
20
comment Show these sets are homeomorphic to eachother
The notation $x\in \Bbb R^2\setminus \{0\}$ implies that $x=(x_1,x_2)$. Hence $x$ in jflipp's comments is really the same as $(x,y)$ in the question.
Nov
15
comment Why isn't Mary a victim of the permutation?
You are really dividing by $1!4!4!$, since there are three groups of people to consider; Mary, female non-Marys, and male students.
Nov
5
answered Origin of the term `quermassintegral'.
Oct
2
comment Mathematical breakthroughs
@AnalysisIncarnate I don't see any objective way to determine what is a breakthrough, and what is of less importance. Even if you say that only the creation of a new field of mathematics qualifies, most fields people work in today did not exist two centuries ago.