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location Kaiserslautern, Germany
age 27
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I am a PhD student at the Algorithms & Complexity group at University of Kaiserslautern, Germany. I research design and analysis of parallel algorithms and data structures.

In my free time I read books, enjoy (and sometimes make) music, code, work out and roam the webs.


You can find sources for all self-created images I post on Stack Exchange here.


1d
revised Two conversions to base three yield different results
Better title, tags and language.
1d
comment Two conversions to base three yield different results
Yes, you are. (Please lay out the calculations in your own words and with the build-in formatting (Markdown + LaTeX).)
1d
suggested suggested edit on Two conversions to base three yield different results
May
5
comment How to compute the pdf of a sum of iid random variable using discrete Fourier transform?
The "characteristic function" is also called moment generating function; wait, what is the $i$ doing there? In any case, this is a pure mathematics question without any apparent connection to CS, so I'm migrating it over to Mathematics.
Apr
25
comment Resources/Books for Discrete Mathematics
@imu96 That would depend on that person's aptitude and the high school, I guess. From what I can tell from the table of contents and some spot checks, basic familiarity with mathematical notation should be sufficient, so I'd say yes. The later chapters (in particular chapter 7, Generating Functions) may require a bit more (e.g. real analysis for chapter 7).
Apr
25
comment Is this BNF grammar ambiguous?
If I read your non-standard notation correctly, 1) is a left-derivation and 2) a right-derivation. Hence, this is not a witness for the grammar being ambiguous.
Apr
2
comment How can a piece of A4 paper be folded in exactly three equal parts?
@moose: I think other letter classes (and even word processors) offer the same thing.
Apr
1
comment Alternative reference for number of restricted partitions
Thanks, but it does -- unfortunately -- not help me. (The recurrence is, of course, given in TAoCP, by the way)
Mar
31
answered Alternative reference for number of restricted partitions
Mar
31
asked Alternative reference for number of restricted partitions
Mar
22
comment Is the ordinary generating function for a sequence $\{a_n\}$ unique?
You probably mean ordinary generating function here.
Feb
20
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
20
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
12
comment MENSA IQ Test and rules of maths
The models we were allowed in high school worked that way. It had support for parentheses, though. (Yea, no auomated graphing and similar stuff for us.)
Feb
10
suggested suggested edit on Variation on finding Stirling numbers of the first kind
Feb
7
comment What is the fastest growing total computable function you can describe in a few lines?
@ColeJohnson: But then the function would be constant.
Jan
25
comment Is computer science a branch of mathematics?
@Renan: I fear for the world in which mathematicians read "ordered by purity" as "ordered by inclusion".
Jan
25
comment Is computer science a branch of mathematics?
@Dunno: No, it's not. At least if you ask computer scientists that try to uphold some measure of mathematical thinking.
Jan
25
comment Why are mathematical proofs that rely on computers controversial?
The fallacy here is, "a person reading it must be convinced that the proof really proves the proposition it is supposed to prove". That's not true. Proofs found by machines are so rigorously formal that they can be checked automatically. Once you are convinced that the proof checker is valid (a more reasonably scoped task) you can be sure that all verified proofs are valid. I'd estimate that such approaches produce less errorneous results than traditional high-level, human-peer reviewed work.
Jan
25
comment Why are mathematical proofs that rely on computers controversial?
I agree. In my estimation/experience, part of the problem is that many mathematicians are not (intuitively) aware of how computers work and what they can do. Also, the way a mathematician approaches finding a proof is not structured but requires ingenuity. Naturally, we don't attribute computers with this. Once you conceive that finding proofs (that are way more rigorous than anything mathematicians publish, usually) can be approached systematically and -- more importantly -- that checking such proofs is easily automated.