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Jan
21
comment Can there be a cubical bubble?
Great answer! Thanks for all the references.
Jan
21
comment Can there be a cubical bubble?
@Rahul Yup, that's what I wanted to know. I just don't really understand how your comment addressed the question. I think there is something about it I'm missing. (I'm not a mathematician.) Will Jagy's answer was pretty much what I wanted.
Jan
21
comment Can there be a cubical bubble?
@Rahul I don't understand, sorry. How does this address whether or not there can be a cubical bubble?
Jan
21
asked Can there be a cubical bubble?
Jan
12
comment How many ways can $b$ balls be distributed in $c$ containers with no more than $n$ balls in any given container?
Thank you. Yes, that was how I got that identity.
Jan
11
accepted How many ways can $b$ balls be distributed in $c$ containers with no more than $n$ balls in any given container?
Jan
11
asked How many ways can $b$ balls be distributed in $c$ containers with no more than $n$ balls in any given container?
Dec
17
comment Fourier transform for dummies
Thanks! I will check it out.
Nov
25
comment Point me the primordial and intuitive concepts about this operations on physics
For an intro to EM, "Electricity and Magnetism" by Purcell is what I used. It was great.
Nov
25
comment Point me the primordial and intuitive concepts about this operations on physics
Well, I'm a physicist and I think I understand electric charge pretty well, but that page still doesn't make sense to me. I suggest finding a better resource.
Nov
25
comment Point me the primordial and intuitive concepts about this operations on physics
what are a, b, and c? It doesn't look like you ever defined them.
Nov
18
comment Fourier-like expansion of a closed curve in 2D
demonstration: youtube.com/watch?v=QVuU2YCwHjw
Nov
18
comment Fourier-like expansion of a closed curve in 2D
We can also think of it as just a usual complex-valued Fourier transform, since complex numbers can represent two dimensions. (I now see that Greg P pointed this out in the comments to the main question.)
Nov
9
awarded  Yearling
Oct
14
answered Fourier transform for dummies
Oct
11
comment What is an example of an application of a higher order derivative ($y^{(n)}$, $n\geq 4$)?
I've heard 4th, 5th, and 6th derivatives called "snap", "crackle", and "pop".
Oct
11
awarded  Nice Question
Sep
15
asked Why can't we interchange differentiation with taking a limit of a series of functions?
Aug
5
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
20
accepted What are the polar coordinates of the origin?