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comment What's your favorite proof accessible to a general audience?
I just wanted to mention that I, too, discovered a similar formula as a child (if middle school counts), and I'm certainly no Gauss! What I discovered was a little different: Sum of a fixed-step sequence = the median multiplied by the count of numbers. For example sum of (1, 2, 3, 4) = 2.5 x 4 = 10. Sum of (2, 4, 6, 8, 10) = 6 x 5 = 30. Sum from 1 to 100 = 50.5 x 100 = 5050.
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comment Finding the sum of two numbers knowing only the primes
@RossMillikan I am doing this in C++ for something work-related and I can't use bignums for this
Jul
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comment Finding the sum of two numbers knowing only the primes
@jameselmore right; I am working with some large numbers in a program and I can't store the full value, so I am trying to store the prime factorization instead to save memory.
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asked Finding the sum of two numbers knowing only the primes
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comment Generating all coprime pairs within limits
A and B might go as high as 40000 each or so. Nothing huge, but large enough to get irritating. Generated one by one is okay.
Jun
17
asked Generating all coprime pairs within limits