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Graduate student trying to learn something.


15h
awarded  Constituent
Dec
15
comment Extending a uniformly continous function to the closure of its domain
I don't think uniform contuinity makes sense in a general topological space. Don't you need a metric space or at least a uniform space?
Dec
15
comment Question in regards to definition: finite dimensional
All vector spaces have a basis. A space is finite dimensional if it's basis is finite. Yes, all $\mathbb{R}^n$ have finite dimension, specifically dimension $n$.
Dec
15
comment Inverse transformation of continous transformation is bounded
This isn't true. What if $f$ is constant?
Dec
15
comment Union of simply connected spaces at a point not simply connected
Jeez, it seems simply connected to me. Is the problem supposed to be if a path switches sides infinitely many times or something?
Dec
14
comment Union of simply connected spaces at a point not simply connected
Basically glue two cone's of hawaian earings.
Dec
14
comment Union of simply connected spaces at a point not simply connected
Ok, I think I understand now.
Dec
14
comment Union of simply connected spaces at a point not simply connected
Maybe each point is reflected across the plane through the origin perpendicular to the line from the point to the origin?
Dec
14
comment Union of simply connected spaces at a point not simply connected
My suggestion doesn't agree with $Y\cap Y'$ is a single point, so it must not be what you meant. Please clarify.
Dec
14
comment Union of simply connected spaces at a point not simply connected
I'm slightly confused. $Y$ is the closed line segments from $(0,0,1)$ to $X$? Is $Y'$ the reflection of $Y$ across the plane $z=0$? I don't think reflection about a point is well defined.
Dec
14
comment covering spaces
I assume you want both spaces to be connected?
Dec
14
answered Graded rings and isomorphisms
Dec
14
revised Show that $f$ is a linear map if $f$ is differentiable and its derivative is constant:
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Dec
14
revised Show that $f$ is a linear map if $f$ is differentiable and its derivative is constant:
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Dec
14
answered Show that $f$ is a linear map if $f$ is differentiable and its derivative is constant:
Dec
14
comment not free modules
That is the contrapositive.
Dec
14
answered not free modules
Dec
13
comment A silly question about $\mathbb{Z}_1$
The cyclic group of one element is a group with only the identity element. It is very different from the infinite group $\mathbb{Z}$
Dec
13
comment show that there exist an element $g$ of a group $G$ such that $g^q$ is in $H$
I hate to be rude, but I hope it wasn't you who downvoted my answer 6 minutes ago. I noticed you were active 7 minutes ago.
Dec
13
revised Confused on notions of maximal ideal and some notation
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