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1h
answered arranging the variables around when using inverse
1d
comment How a mathematician would call a set that acts like a texture in infinite surface covered with it?
You're going to have to define the concepts you're asking about if you hope to get an answer.
1d
answered Engineer searching for calculus and complex analysis books without limits
Sep
19
reviewed Reject suggested edit on can you differentiate $y(x)=x^4 - 2x^2+8x$
Sep
18
answered How to find the total number of drinks possible
Sep
17
answered What’s the difference between Analytical and Numerical approaches to problems?
Sep
17
comment MATLAB Newton's Method Help Needed
@Dmoreno Thanks for the reminder on the terminology :) Every time I encounter this, I think back to my Russian professor, who simply called it "dis little alfa".
Sep
17
revised MATLAB Newton's Method Help Needed
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Sep
17
revised MATLAB Newton's Method Help Needed
added 877 characters in body
Sep
17
answered MATLAB Newton's Method Help Needed
Sep
17
answered What is the 'formula' of a composite function?
Sep
16
answered Divided Differences - Let f be in Cn[a , b]. Prove that if x0 is in (a , b) and if x1, x2, …., xn all converge to x0
Sep
16
answered Evaluation of derivative: if $p(x)=b_0 + (x-z)q(x)$, then $p'(z)=q(z)$
Sep
16
comment Evaluation of derivative: if $p(x)=b_0 + (x-z)q(x)$, then $p'(z)=q(z)$
I've also changed the tags, since this question really has nothing to do with Numerical Analysis at all.
Sep
16
revised Evaluation of derivative: if $p(x)=b_0 + (x-z)q(x)$, then $p'(z)=q(z)$
added 67 characters in body
Sep
16
comment Evaluation of derivative: if $p(x)=b_0 + (x-z)q(x)$, then $p'(z)=q(z)$
That is correct, although some additional formatting would make this a much easier read.
Sep
16
comment Prove that exponential functions grow faster than polynomial
This statement is essentially saying "an exponential grows faster than a power". Try picking arbitrary values of $r$ and $s$ and treat $n$ as a variable. Suppose $s = e$ and $r = 1$. Is there a point $n_0$ at which $n_0 = ke^{n_0}$? What about to the right of that point?
Sep
16
comment Square Inches vs Inches Squared
I will also note that the interpretation that "12 inches squared" means "a square 12 inches on a side" only really makes sense in any context in which you actually expect a square -- such as manufacturing or something. It doesn't make any difference if you are talking about pressure, for instance: "fill the tire to 30 pounds per inches squared" is unambiguous, as the meaning is clear and you don't need to find any nice happy squares in your tire.
Sep
16
comment Square Inches vs Inches Squared
I would contend that they are the same, with the caveat that the phrasing "12 inches, squared", emphasis on the comma, implies what @mistermarko suggests. I see the terminology used interchangeably, often depending on the speaker's native language.
Sep
16
comment NFL playoff probabilities
Yes, it becomes more complicated when you factor in the schedule and tie breakers and such. However, I'm not sure it's an interesting endeavor to mathematically model the seven tiebreaker steps for wild cards. I'd bet that historically, the actual chances are approximately 22%. I'll check when I get to my pc.