457 reputation
519
bio website
location Southern California
age 17
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen 59 mins ago

Hi, I'm Cole. Here's my Twitter. I'm the creator of iDecryptIt, and the founder of Hexware.

profile for Cole Johnson on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites" title="profile for Cole Johnson on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


4h
comment Get 5 by doing any operations with four 7
Kind of a duplicate of the accepted answer.
4h
comment Get 5 by doing any operations with four 7
If using $2$ for a squaring operation is not allowed, using square roots shouldn't be allowed as they are the same as raising to the ${^1/_2}$ power.
Aug
29
comment What is the average of no numbers?
@BrianS Except that Float and Double extend from Object (in C# and Java), so a function returning either could easily return null.
Aug
22
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
12
revised How do I solve $\vert x\vert^{x^2-2x} = 1$?
fixed up english
Aug
12
suggested suggested edit on How do I solve $\vert x\vert^{x^2-2x} = 1$?
Jul
19
suggested suggested edit on Deducing an optimal gambling strategy (using martingales).
Jul
19
suggested suggested edit on Maximal ideals and maximal subspaces of normed algebras
Jul
19
suggested suggested edit on Continuity of a function in two variables
Jul
15
revised Interview riddle
removed smily
Jul
15
suggested suggested edit on Interview riddle
Jul
15
suggested suggested edit on Solving base e equation
Jul
14
revised How do I solve $y' = \sin(x - y)$?
fixed grammar
Jul
14
suggested suggested edit on How do I solve $y' = \sin(x - y)$?
Jul
12
comment Prove that $\sqrt[2012]{2012!}<\sqrt[2013]{2013!}$
Fun fact related to this question: The function $f(x) = \sqrt[x]{x}$ has a maximum at $(e, \sqrt[e]{e})$ and is decreasing on the right of the maximum to infinity. Also, the derivative of $\sqrt[x]{x!}$ is $e^{-1}$.
Jul
12
comment Prove that $\sqrt[2012]{2012!}<\sqrt[2013]{2013!}$
@Lucian Why would that help? $\frac{2013!}{2012!}$ is just $2013$ ($\frac{n!}{(n-1)!} \equiv n$)
Jul
12
revised Why does $1+2+3+\dots = -\frac{1}{12}$?
removed unneeded equation
Jul
12
suggested suggested edit on Why does $1+2+3+\dots = -\frac{1}{12}$?
Jul
12
comment Funny identities
Related: Why does $1+2+3+\dots = -\frac{1}{12}$?
Jul
12
revised Funny identities
Fixing dumped link