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seen Nov 4 '13 at 21:16

Jul
14
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Oct
23
comment Transitivity of norm in the general case
I guess not. Note that it might just be wishfull thinking on might part to expect it to be true. If it's false I would be interested in a counter example and any kind of statement which gives some necessary (or sufficient) conditions for it to be true.
Oct
22
comment isomorphic localization of finitely presented modules
Nope but now I'm very much convinced that you were right (arguments works over $\mathbb{Q}$). I haven't read the whole document though so maybe he uses the result somewhere over $\mathbb{Q}_p$ somewhere down the road.
Oct
22
accepted isomorphic localization of finitely presented modules
Oct
22
comment isomorphic localization of finitely presented modules
Thanks a lot ! if you post this as an answer I'll accept it.
Oct
22
revised isomorphic localization of finitely presented modules
deleted 1 characters in body
Oct
22
revised isomorphic localization of finitely presented modules
added 265 characters in body
Oct
22
asked isomorphic localization of finitely presented modules
Oct
20
asked Transitivity of norm in the general case
Oct
18
accepted Ramified prime in cyclotomic extension of a number field
Oct
17
revised Ramified prime in cyclotomic extension of a number field
edited title
Oct
17
asked Ramified prime in cyclotomic extension of a number field
Oct
12
comment ring of integers in extension of $\mathbb{Q}_p$ and number field
Thanks for your comments. Alex your remark seems correct to me (and definetly simpler), maybe we are missing something.
Oct
12
asked ring of integers in extension of $\mathbb{Q}_p$ and number field
Jul
4
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
18
comment roots of a polynomial mod $p^n$
Yes I realized afterwards that my question was wrong.
Jun
17
comment roots of a polynomial mod $p^n$
AH yes that's true
Jun
17
comment roots of a polynomial mod $p^n$
In fact there are some flaws in my question since it is false that modulo $p$ the polynomial has only two roots. For example $X^2 -2$ has three roots in $(\mathbb{Z}/2\mathbb{Z})[\sqrt 2]$
Jun
17
comment roots of a polynomial mod $p^n$
Hi I guess my problem is that I don't assume that the roots are in $\mathbb{Z}$ so the version of Hensel lemma in wikipedia doesn't seem to apply here right ? Also Hensel lemma tells me that each root that I have (modulo the previous problem) lifts uniquely to a root mod $p^n$ (because there are two distinct roots mod p) but it doesn't tell me that there are no more (I think).